Dec 13, 2019  
2007-2009 Catalog 
    
2007-2009 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Information


Click on any of the following links for information:

How to Use the Catalog

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Where to Find Information

This Catalog is divided into twelve sections:

General Information

Material on how to use the Catalog; the academic calendar; an introduction to the University including objectives, programs, and a history; admission and orientation procedures, tuition and fees, residence regulations, financial aid, and extended hours.

Academic Policies of the University

Academic Regulations; Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Resources for the University Community

Information about the Library, Advising, Adult Resource, Women’s and Writing Centers, Information Technology Services, Experiential Education, and WFUM; descriptions of social, recreational, and support services offered through the Student Development Center and the Office of Student Life.

Programs of Study

A guide to programs and degrees listing all concentration majors and minors, and information on undergraduate study, and Extension and Continuing Education.

General Education Program

General education program requirements and a planning worksheet.

College of Arts and Sciences
Undergraduate Programs and Courses

School of Education and Human Services
Undergraduate Programs and Courses

School of Health Professions and Studies
Undergraduate Programs and Courses

School of Management
Undergraduate Programs and Courses

Graduate Programs and Courses

Specific information on regulations, procedures, programs, degrees and courses.

University Honors Program and Courses

Directory

Personnel listings; the index; maps of the campus; offices to contact for further information.

How to Read a Course Description

Course Offerings

The Catalog includes information for each academic department or program, followed by a list of course offerings. Brackets [ ] enclosing a course entry, with the description omitted, indicate a low probability that this course will be offered. A schedule of courses to be offered in each semester or term is published prior to the registration period for that semester or term. Courses are offered during an academic year composed of 14-week fall and winter semesters and 7-week spring and summer terms. Some courses meet for more than seven weeks during the spring and summer.

Course Numbers and Titles

Course numbers and titles are printed in the Catalog in boldface type. A number in parentheses following the course number indicates that the course had previously been listed by this number. Courses numbered 100 to 299 are introductory and intermediate courses; those numbered 300 to 499 are usually advanced undergraduate courses. Courses numbered 500 and above are for graduate students and may not be elected by undergraduates except with approval from the school or college.

Prerequisites and Requirements

Some courses carry specific prerequisites printed in italics immediately following the course number and title.

Credits

Credit is indicated by an italic number in parentheses following the course title and prerequisites (if any). Credits are earned by semester hours. One credit is usually earned for each hour of lecture per week in courses offered during a fall or winter semester, or for each two hours of lecture per week during a spring or summer term. Courses with labs involve additional hours of meeting time each week.

Symbols Used in Course Descriptions

Many courses apply toward General Education Requirements. (See the section “General Education Program ” for further explanation.)
The letter f, h, n, or s in italics immediately following the number of credits, indicates the General Education Requirement to which a course applies:

f
fine arts
h humanities
n
natural science
s social science

Special Information

Information in italics following the course description gives any special information. For example, if a course is listed in more than one department, this crosslisting is given. If the course can be elected more than once or must be taken concurrently with another course, this is designated here.

Grades

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Most courses are graded on an ABCDE system. Unless another grading system appears, this is the grading system used. When an alternate grading system is used, the information appears in italics at the end of the course description. Pass/Fail indicates that a course is offered only on a pass/fail basis. In ABC>N, ABCC->N, ABCD>N, and ABCDD->N courses, the grade printed just before the > sign is the lowest grade for which credit is granted.

Sample Course Description

The example which follows may help in interpreting the information included in course descriptions.

156. Great Books II. HON 155 or consent of Honors Director. (5)h.

Continuation of HON 155, including two class periods a week of written critical analysis. Works from the Enlightenment to the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Completion of HON 155 and 156 fulfills the general education requirement in English composition. Graded ABC>N.

The number and name of the course are in bold type. The prerequisites follow in italics. The student must have taken Honors 155 or obtain the consent of the Director of the Honors Program in order to elect this class. The (5) indicates that this is a five-credit class. The h means that it counts for humanities credit in the General Education Requirements.

The course description is given, followed by special information, printed in italics. The grading system is given; the lowest grade for which credit is granted for this course is a C. (If no grading system is listed, the course is graded on an ABCDE system.)

Course Abbreviations

AFA Africana Studies
AGE Aging
AMC American Culture
ANE Anesthesia
ANT Anthropology
ARB Arabic
ARH Art History
ART Art
AST Astronomy
BIO Biology
BUS Business
CAS College of Arts and Sciences
CHM Chemistry
CHN Mandarin Chinese
CIS Computer Information Systems
COM Communication
CPL Comparative Literature
CRJ Criminal Justice
CSC Computer Science
DAN Dance
ECE Early Childhood Education
ECN Economics
EDE Elementary Education
EDL Education Leadership
EDM Mathematics Education
EDN Education of Students with Special Needs
EDR Reading & Language Arts
EDS Secondary Education
EDT Technology Education
EHS School of Education and Human Services Courses
EDU Education
EGR Engineering
ENG English
ENV Environmental Studies
FFS French and Francophone Studies
FOR Foreign Languages
FRN French
GEO Physical Geography
GER German
HCR Health Care
HED Health Education
HIS History  
HLS Hispanic and Literature Studies  
HON Honors
INT International and Global Studies
ITL Italian
JPN Japanese
JRN Journalism
LAT Latin
LIN Linguistics
MES “Middle Eastern” Studies
MGT Management
MTH Mathematics
MTP Medical Technology
MUS Music
NUR Nursing
NSC Nursing Support Course
PHL Philosophy
PHY Physics
PHS Public Health Science
POL Political Science
PSY Psychology
PTP Physical Therapy
PUB Public Administration
RPL Resource Planning
RTT Radiation Therapy
RUS Russian
SAT Substance Abuse Treatment
SCI Science
SOC Sociology
SPN Spanish
SWK Social Work
THE Theatre
WGS Women’s and Gender Studies

 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR*

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SUMMER TERM 2007

March

21

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

5

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

July

2

Monday

Classes begin

 

3 (10:30 p.m.)

Tuesday

Holiday recess begins

 

4

Wednesday

Holiday- Independence Day

 

5

Thursday

Classes resume

August

18

Saturday

Classes end

 

19

Sunday

Study Day

 

20-22

Mon-Wed

Examinations

FALL TERM 2007

March

21

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

5

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

August

29

Wednesday

Classes begin

September

3

Monday

Holiday- Labor Day

November

20 (10:30 p.m.)

Tuesday

Thanksgiving recess begins

 

26

Monday

Classes resume

December

10

Monday

Classes end

 

11

Tuesday

Study day

 

12-15, 17-19

Wed-Sat, Mon-Wed

Examinations

 

9

Sunday

Commencement

WINTER TERM 2008

November

14

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

December

3

Monday

Registration for new students opens

January

7

Monday

Classes begin

 

21

Monday

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

 

 

(classes cancelled, university open)

 

February

23 (10:30 p.m.)

Saturday

Spring recess begins

March

3

Monday

Classes resume

April

21

Monday

Classes end

 

22

Tuesday

Study day

 

23-26, 28-30

Wed-Sat, Mon-Wed

Examinations

 

27

Sunday

Commencement

SPRING TERM 2008

March

19

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

3

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

May

5

Monday

Classes begin

 

24 (10:30 p.m.)

Saturday

Holiday recess begins

 

26

Monday

Holiday- Memorial Day

 

27

Tuesday

Classes resume

June

23

Monday

Classes end

 

24

Tuesday

Study Day

 

25-27

Wed-Fri

Examinations

SUMMER TERM 2008

March

19

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

3

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

June

30

Monday

Classes begin

July

3 (10:30 p.m.)

Thursday

Holiday recess begins

 

4

Friday

Holiday-Independence Day

 

7

Monday

Classes resume

August

16

Saturday

Classes end

 

17

Sunday

Study Day

 

18-20

Mon-Wed

Examinations

FALL TERM 2008

March

19

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

3

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

August

27

Wednesday

Classes begin

September

1

Monday

Holiday- Labor Day

November

25 (10:30 p.m.)

Tuesday

Thanksgiving recess begins

December

1

Monday

Classes resume

 

8

Monday

Classes end

 

9

Tuesday

Study day

 

10-13, 15-17

Wed-Sat, Mon-Wed

Examinations

 

14

Sunday

Commencement

WINTER TERM 2009

November

12

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

December

1

Monday

Registration for new students opens

January

5

Monday

Classes begin

 

19

Monday

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

 

 

(classes cancelled, university open)

 

February

21 (10:30 p.m.)

Saturday

Spring recess begins

March

2

Monday

Classes resume

April

20

Monday

Classes end

 

21

Tuesday

Study day

 

22-25, 27-29

Wed-Sat, Mon-Wed

Examinations

May

3

Sunday

Commencement

SPRING TERM 2009

March

18

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

2

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

May

4

Monday

Classes begin

 

23 (10:30 p.m.)

Saturday

Holiday recess begins

 

25

Monday

Holiday -Memorial Day

 

26

Tuesday

Classes resume

June

22

Monday

Classes end

 

23

Tuesday

Study Day

 

24-26

Wed-Fri

Examinations

SUMMER TERM 2009

March

18

Wednesday

Registration for continuing students opens

April

2

Thursday

Registration for new students opens

June

29

Monday

Classes begin

 

2 (10:30 p.m.)

Thursday

Holiday recess begins

 

3

Friday

Holiday- Independence Day

 

6

Monday

Classes resume

August

15

Saturday

Classes end

 

16

Sunday

Study Day

 

17-19

Mon-Wed

Examinations

*This calendar is subject to revision.

Introduction to the University

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Educational Objectives

“Engaging Minds, Preparing Leaders” is the vision statement of the University of Michigan-Flint. The University subscribes to the following mission: The Flint campus of the University of Michigan is a community of diverse learners and scholars, where students from this region and beyond prepare for leadership, achievement, and service through interactive instruction in the arts, sciences, humanities, and professions. Our mission rests on three pillars: excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship; student-centeredness; and engaged citizenship. Our students become leaders in their fields, in their professions, and in their communities.

The University of Michigan-Flint, organized originally as the Flint College of the University of Michigan, is one of three campuses of the University of Michigan. From its founding in 1956, the University of Michigan-Flint has represented the combined efforts of the University, the State of Michigan, and the Flint community to develop and maintain a distinguished educational program for young people and adults of outstanding ambition, ability, and potential for leadership.

Students at the Flint campus benefit from association with the entire University of Michigan system while also enjoying the many advantages of a smaller institution. At the University of Michigan-Flint, the student is the center of attention. Individual growth and intellectual development are encouraged through close and often informal association between faculty and students.

All students at the University of Michigan-Flint, including those entering specific career and professional programs, are offered a well-rounded education in the traditional disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences. The urban setting of the campus and the need for competently trained professionals in education, government, business, and the health and human services fields have led to the creation of a variety of programs. These programs have been designed to provide professional training in relationship to study in the liberal arts and sciences, so that students can develop the knowledge, intellectual skills, values and attitudes which will help them make thoughtful and informed judgments about their experiences.

Programs

The College of Arts and Sciences offers over 50 majors in the liberal arts and sciences, together with programs preparing for Michigan certification in elementary or secondary teaching. These programs lead to the degrees Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Bachelor of Applied Science, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Master of Science in Biology, Master of Science in Computer and Information Systems, Master of Arts in English, and Master of Arts in Social Sciences from the University of Michigan-Flint.

The School of Education and Human Services offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Education and Social Work, the Bachelor of Science in Education, and the Master of Arts in Education.

The School of Health Professions and Studies offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Administration, Health Education, Health Science, Medical        Technology, Radiation Therapy, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, the Master of Science in Anesthesia, the Master of Science in Health Education, the Master of Science in Nursing, and the Doctor of Physical Therapy.

The School of Management offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Business Administration degree in General Business, Accounting, Finance, Operations Management, Organizational Behavior/Human Resources Management, or Marketing and the Master of Business Administration degree.

In addition to these programs, the University of Michigan- Flint offers the Master of Liberal Studies in American Culture and the Master of Public Administration with a general track and four concentrations through the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies of the University of Michigan, as well as graduate courses in other selected areas.

The University of Michigan-Flint makes its academic programs available throughout the year by operating on a calendar that includes fall and winter semesters and shorter spring and summer terms. Courses are offered throughout the year in the late afternoon and evening as well as during daytime hours. Additional course offerings are available on Saturdays during the fall, winter, and spring terms.

Accreditation and Assessment

The University of Michigan-Flint is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504. Accreditation has also been awarded to various University of Michigan-Flint programs by the American Chemical Society, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – International, the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, the Council on Accreditation for Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs, the Council on Social Work Education, the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, and the National Association of Schools of Music.

Grounded in the principles of student-centered learning, our Assessment Program provides evidence of the knowledge, skills, and perspectives that students achieve as a result of their education at the Univeristy of Michigan-Flint. In gathering and analyzing the evidence of our effectiveness, we are able to improve the institution through reflective, sound decisionmaking, enabling the University of Michigan-Flint to further its mission to prepare students as leaders in their fields, in their professions, and in their communities. The primary purpose of assessment is to help understand and improve the University of Michigan-Flint as a whole. Secondarily, assessment is used to support accreditation, research, grant funding, and other external purposes.

Assessment of student learning and achievement is a campuswide endeavor that presents a variety of opportunities for students, faculty, staff, and alumni to provide valuable feedback to all units. The University encourages everyone to accept the responsibility and opportunity to participate in this important process. Additional information on assessment is available at http://assessment.umflint.edu.

UM-Flint History

The history of the University of Michigan-Flint began in 1944, when the Flint Board of Education requested that a University of Michigan Extension Office open in Flint. Key area citizens, already planning the cultural center, were interested in the idea of higher education in the community. Three years later, the Regents of the University funded a study exploring the possibilities for higher education in Flint.

Cooperation between the community and U-M brought about the opening of a two-year senior college in 1956. The Board of Regents adopted a proposal in 1964 to expand the senior college to a four-year institution. The first freshman class was admitted the next year making the Flint College the first four-year University of Michigan program offered outside of Ann Arbor. In 1971, the Regents officially changed the name of the institution to the University of Michigan-Flint.

Through the combined efforts of Flint citizens and city government, the University acquired 42 acres along the southern edge of the Flint River in 1971. The campus occupied its first building in 1976. The general classroom-office building (later named David M. French Hall in 2000) housed classrooms, faculty offices, a theatre and library. The Harding Mott University Center opened in 1979 and the Recreation Center followed in fall 1981. With the opening of the Murchie Science Building in 1988, students no longer had to take science classes on the Mott Community College campus. The Frances Willson Thompson Library opened its doors to students in late fall 1994.

In 1997, the campus acquired an additional 25 acres immediately north of the Flint River, where the William S. White Building was completed in 2002. A grant from the Mott Foundation provided the University with funds to assist with the construction and programming of new facilities on the north riverfront site. This mixed-use building houses the School of Health Professions and Studies, School of Management, Early Childhood Development and then Urban Health and Wellness Centers, Department of Communication and Visual Arts, Information Technology Services,and WFUM television.

The mission of the University rests on three pillars: academic excellence, student centeredness and engaged citizenship. The urban location affords an opportunity to provide a University of Michigan education to students with varied life experiences.

UM-Flint’s 6,500+ students choose from over 100 undergraduate and nearly 30 graduate programs in the liberal arts and in a number of pre-professional and professional fields. In 2006, the Univeristy of Michigan – Flint celebrated 50 Years of Excellence and still the expansion of the University remains a work in progress to meet the needs of the community and to foster a collegiate atmosphere for students in pursuit of a quality education.

In October 2006, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan approved a housing-facility project for the Flint campus. The 300+ bed residential hall will be located on 5.25 acres on the southern edge of the campus and open Fall 2008. UM-Flint recently adopted a strategic plan to grow enrollment to 8,000 students by 2010. A key element of this plan is the creation of a residential option for students. This new component is expected to stimulate campus life as well as contribute to the redevelopment of downtown Flint.

Admissions

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245 University Pavilion
(810) 762-3300
FAX (810)762-3272
admissions@umflint.edu
Website: http://www.umflint.edu/admissions

Director: Kimberly Buster-Williams, M.S.Ed.

Admissions Counseling
The University of Michigan-Flint provides information and admissions counseling for prospective students. Interviews are a desirable part of the admission procedure. Appointments may be made throughout the week, Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., and Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. by telephoning (810) 762-3300.

Freshmen

Admission Policy
Students entering college for the first time following high school graduation should list themselves as freshmen even if they have some college credit. The GED may be presented in place of a high school diploma.

Students who enter the University of Michigan-Flint should have the capacity, maturity, and preparation to pursue a four-year degree. To apply, students must submit the following to the Office of Admissions:

  • Completed application form
  • Official high school transcript
  • $30 nonrefundable application fee
  • ACT or SAT scores (Applicants should request that scores be sent to the University of Michigan-Flint, ACT code 2063 or SAT code 1853.)

The admission decision takes into account all available academic data, including grades, test scores, and caliber of high school program. The University may consider nonacademic factors in the admission decision including information it receives regarding the applicant’s leadership qualities, exceptional talents, conduct, and citizenship record. The University of Michigan - Flint seeks to admit students likely to succeed in our rigorous academic programs and who are ready to be responsible members of the University community.

Application forms are available through the Office of Admissions and in local high school guidance offices. Applications are available online at www.umflint.edu/admissions. Students may submit applications after completing their junior year in high school. Early application is encouraged. Inquiries should be addressed to:

Office of Admissions
University of Michigan-Flint
245 University Pavilion
Flint, Michigan 48502-1950

or prospective students may telephone (810) 762-3300, or e-mail Admissions@umflint.edu

Subject Requirements

A strong high school preparatory program of basic academic subjects is important for college study. The following subjects, known as the State Universities of Michigan Presidents Council core, are recommended for regular admission:

English. Four years.

Mathematics. Three years, including intermediate algebra. This requirement is particularly important for students considering study in physical or biological sciences, computer science, the behavioral sciences, or business administration. Four years highly recommended.

Biological/Physical Science. Two years of laboratory science. Three to four years highly recommended.

Social Studies. Three years.

Courses in the fine arts, foreign language, and computer science are highly recommended. Business and vocational courses are not counted as academic courses. Exceptions to these recommendations will be viewed in relation to the other credentials presented. Individual consideration is given to candidates whose schools or independent-study programs do not offer all the required courses.

Transfer Students

Students who have taken courses in college after high school graduation are considered transfer students and should file an application as early as possible. To apply, transfer students mustsubmit the following:

  • Completed application form
  • Official high school transcript
  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities
  • attended
  • $30 nonrefundable application fee

Admission is based on all available academic data, including grades earned at previously attended post-secondary institutions, the strength of academic achievements in 24 or more semester hours of transferable college credit, and for students with fewer than 24 transferable credit hours, high school records and other credentials. The University may consider nonacademic factors in the admission decision including information it receives regarding the applicant’s leadership qualities, exceptional talents, conduct, and citizenship record.

Transfer of Credits

All acceptable courses completed with a grade of C or better at a regionally accredited two-year or four-year institution areentered on the student’s permanent record and may be applied toward graduation requirements. A transfer student from a non- University of Michigan college must earn a minimum of 45 semester hours at University of Michigan-Flint, including the last 30 hours. Students from the University of Michigan Ann Arbor and Dearborn must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours on the University of Michigan-Flint campus. Given upper level requirements in the major, generally a maximum of 62 credit hours from two-year institutions and a maximum of 75 credit hours from four-year institutions can be applied to degree requirements. Credit requirements for programs vary; it is critical that students consult with advisors to determine exactly how many credits beyond transfer will be required to complete any particular program of study.

Teacher Certification

Applicants who already have a bachelor’s degree from a school approved for teacher education and wish to obtain teacher certification must apply as transfer students and submit the following:

  • Completed application form
  • Proof of bachelor’s degree - One copy of all official transcripts must be sent to the Office of Admissions. In addition, the University of Michigan-Flint Education Department requires that two official copies of all transcripts be sent directly to them.
  • $30 nonrefundable application fee

The deadlines for application to the Education Department are January 15 and September 15.

Guest Students

Students enrolled at another accredited college or university may attend the University of Michigan-Flint as guest students if they receive permission for each term from both the Office of Admissions of the University of Michigan-Flint and their homeinstitution.

Guest students must be in good standing at their home institution and have at least a 2.0 grade point average. The student should consult the home institution to verify that the classes taken at the University of Michigan-Flint are acceptable. Students must earn C grades or better in all courses taken at the University of Michigan-Flint to be considered for future admission as guests.

A one-time nonrefundable $15.00 application fee is charged for processing the guest application.

A guest student who intends to become a degree candidate at the University of Michigan-Flint must submit an application for admission with advanced standing, accompanied by all official credentials.

Life-Long Learning Students

Students wishing to pursue studies not leading to a degree may apply for Lifelong Learning status. Students entering under the Lifelong Learning status will follow the catalog year the semester they matriculate. Credits under Lifelong Learning status may count towards a degree seeking program with academic departmental approval. Students that have attended previous colleges and universities are required to submit official transcripts from every school attended before an application for a degree seeking program may be granted. High school graduates without any prior college work may qualify for admission to a degree program by completing 24 credits with grades of C (2.0) or better in courses from each of the following areas: (1) science or mathematics; (2) social sciences; (3) humanities/English composition/basic foreign language. Financial aid is extremely limited for Lifelong Learning students.

To apply, Lifelong Learning students must submit the following:

  • Completed application form
  • $30 nonrefundable application fee
  • Proof of high school graduation

International Students

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Students from other countries may apply for admission to the University of Michigan-Flint.

The following documents must be received before a decision on admission can be made:

  1. A completed application with a $30.00 (U.S. currency) check or money order. No application shall be processed without the required nonrefundable $30.00 fee.
  2. Students with credit from countries other than the U.S. must apply for a course-by-course credit evaluation through an approved credentialing service. The course-by-course evaluation is not required when the transcript is in English and credit hours are expressed in semester units. Contact the Office of Admissions for a listing of approved agencies. There is a fee for this service from the evaluation agency.
  3. For any student whose native language is not English, evidence of proficiency in English is required. Several English proficiency tests are accepted; see UM-Flint international student web site (http://www.umflint.edu/international) for details.
  4. Upon admission, a notarized statement from the financial sponsor verifying that the student has at least $20,000 per academic year (excluding transportation to and from abroad) to cover living and educational expenses while attending the University of Michigan-Flint. Students from the Ontario province must provide a notarized statement from the financial sponsor verifying that the student has at least $13,940 per academic year. No needs-based financial aid is available to international students. International students are never considered “Residents of Michigan” for tuition classification.

Admission Procedures

Application Deadlines

Fall (September classes):  
  Priority Deadlines:  
  Freshmen November 1
  Transfer Students July 1
  Final Deadline: Ten business days prior to the first day of classes. (Labor Day not included.)
Winter (January classes):  
  Priority Deadlines: October 1
  Final Deadline: Ten business days prior to the first day of classes. (Holiday break not included.)

Application Fee
A nonrefundable fee of $30 must accompany each formal freshman, transfer, and non-candidate for degree application. No application fee is required of applicants for readmission.

This fee does not apply to any other University fee, although it also serves as the application fee for those applying to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor or Dearborn. If an accepted applicant does not register, the fee is good for three consecutive semesters, beginning with the semester for which admission was initially requested.

A check or money order payable to the University of Michigan-Flint should accompany the application. For purposes of identification, the applicant’s name and Social Security number are to be written on the front of the payment. For reasons of security, cash should not be sent through the mail.

Additional Information

Advanced Placement Program (AP)

The University of Michigan-Flint participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. Advanced Placement credits can be earned in the following subjects: art, biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, English, French, German, American and comparative government, American and European history, Latin, mathematics, music, physics, psychology, and Spanish. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Credit is awarded for several subject area tests. For information on the subjects available, passing scores, eligibility, etc., contact the Office of Admissions.

Admission to the University Honors Scholar Program

Admission to the Honors Program is competitive and by invitation only. A student must satisfy the below requirements to apply for the Honors Program:

  1. Composite ACT score of 26 or higher or a combined SAT score of at least 1200.
  2. A minimum recomputed academic grade point average of 3.5, based on no less than eight academic units of credit during the ninth, tenth, and eleventh years and the first semester of the senior year.

Selection is made on the basis of high school records, test scores, recommendations from high school counselors or college advisors, and personal interviews. If not selected initially, students may be admitted to the program after establishing a record of superior University performance. The first deadline forconsideration is February 8; the second deadline is March 1, and the last consideration date is April 1. For details contact: 

Director of the Honors Program
517 David M. French Hall
The University of Michigan-Flint
Flint, Michigan 48502-1950
(810) 762-3234

Admission to the Challenge Program

The University of Michigan-Flint is committed to providing educational opportunity for all qualified students. The Challenge Program is an alternative admission procedure for students who have academic potential but who would be unable to realize that potential without special support services due to their economic, cultural, or educational background. Services available to students admitted through the Challenge Program help those students maximize their potential for success.

Challenge Program participants are selected based on the recomputed academic grade point average, high school record, and recommendations from high school counselors. It is a selective program and not all applicants are offered admission. Challenge Program participants must sign contractual admission forms with the University.

Interested students should consult their high school counselors or write to:

Office of Admissions
245 University Pavilion
The University of Michigan-Flint
Flint, Michigan 48502-1950
(810) 762-3300

Dual Enrollment for Part-Time Study by High School Students

Outstanding high school students may enroll for part-time study as non-candidates for degree while finishing their high school graduation requirements. High school seniors are required to have a 3.2 recomputed grade point average in high school academic subjects in the 9, 10th and/or 11th grades.

Official enrollment through the high school may require additional standards including a high school proficiency test. Tuition reimbursement may be available. Students should check with the high school guidance and counseling office for additional information.

A maximum of two classes per semester is allowed for dual enrollees. Dual enrollees file the usual application as noncandidates for degree, but are not required to pay the application fee. Dual enrolled students that intend to enroll as freshmen at the University of Michigan-Flint should submit a free one-page application for freshmen admission after dual enrollment at the University of Michigan-Flint.

Readmission

Students planning to return after an absence of one year must apply for readmission to the University of Michigan-Flint Office of Admissions. If a student has been away from the University of Michigan-Flint for one year or more, the student must satisfy degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission. If a student has attended another college or university since leaving the University of Michigan-Flint, an official transcript from that institution must be submitted and students must complete a new admissions application.

No fee is charged for processing the application for readmission. Students interested in readmission to the School of Management should refer to the readmission policy in the School of Management section of this Catalog.

Any student who has been officially asked to withdraw from the University of Michigan-Flint and who seeks readmission must file an application for readmission at the Office of Admissions and/or an explanatory petition, either to the Academic Standards Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences or to the Academic Review Committee of the School of Management. Students in the School of Health Professions and Studies should consult the Dean of the School of Health Professions and Studies.

No student is readmitted until all past fees and charges due to the University of Michigan-Flint have been paid.

Admission to Graduate Programs at the Flint Campus

Admission applications for University of Michigan-Flint graduate programs are available in the Office for Graduate Programs (251 Thompson Library) or through the directors of the respective master’s degree programs. For further information about admission requirements, see “Graduate Study” section of this Catalog.

Orientation and Placement

Orientation

375 Harding Mott University Center
(810) 762-3431
Fax: (810) 762-3023

Director of New Student Programs: Becky Armour

New students are invited to attend an orientation session prior to registering for classes. Sessions are designed to increase the newly admitted student’s understanding of some important aspects of life at the University. During orientation, students are provided with information on academic programs and requirements, University policies and procedures, and student life. New students have an opportunity to interact with faculty, staff, and continuing students during the orientation process.

Orientation sessions for incoming freshmen are required and are held throughout the summer. Orientation sessions for transfer students are held during the summer and winter months.

Placement Testing

As a current, newly admitted or readmitted student, you may need to take one or more placement tests. Placement tests are critical to you and your advisor since the results will be used to plan your program of study. Placement tests should be taken before you meet with an advisor. Placement tests in chemistry, English, and mathematics are offered online or in the Academic Advising and Career Center ((810) 762-3085). Placement tests in foreignlanguage are offered through the foreign language department.

Placement tests are never used as a basis for awarding credit. The Credit by Examination procedure is described elsewhere in this Catalog. The College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Management, and the Program in Nursing have procedures for awarding Credit by Examination (refer to those sections of this Catalog).

Tuition and Fees*

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Please refer to the following website for tuition and fee rates; http://www.umflint.edu/finaid/tuition.htm

Tuition must be received by the due dates or monthly interest charges will be assessed. Allow a minimum of 5 days handling by the U.S. Postal Service if payment is mailed. Failure to receive an official University tuition and fee statement does not relieve any student of responsibility for payment. All billing is now donethrough the student’s UM-Flint email account.

Fees are the student’s contribution toward the cost of instruction, library services, student activities, plant operations, and mandatory payments for debt retirement for parking facilitiesand the Library. There are certain laboratory charges to cover unusual breakage.

A student may not register for any classes at the University nor are transcripts of credits or diplomas issued until all outstanding fees and charges due the University are paid.

*The University of Michigan – Flint reserves the right to adjust tuition rates and the credit hour range that is assessed the full-time rate.

Fees for Senior Citizens

Persons 62 years of age or older at time of registration have the privilege of enrolling in any University course or program for which they are properly qualified, on payment of a fee equal to 50 percent of the announced fee for such course or program, exclusive of laboratory fees and other special charges. It is the responsibility of the senior citizen to notify Student Accounts when they qualify for the discount. The University reserves the right to determine in each case the appropriateness of the election.

Late Registration Fee

A student who registers after the announced period of registration is charged a late registration fee.

Adjustment of Fees

Deadline dates are calculated from the first day of the Academic Calendar for each term.

Drop/Add

Once classes officially begin a Drop/Add form must be completed when a student changes the classes registered for (an increase, decrease, or no change in credit hours) but retains at least one credit hour. If all classes are dropped, see “Disenrollment” below. A student must submit the authorized Drop/Add form to the Registrar’s Office; the date it is received by the Registrar is the effective date. Even though there is no total credit hour effect of a Drop/Add (add 3 credit hours and drop 3 credit hours), each transaction is recorded independently and may result in an additional financial obligation.

  1. When a student adds a course, the previous fee assessment is canceled and a new fee is assessed applicable to the new load.
  2. A student who drops a course during the first two weeks of classes in any term has the original fee assessment canceled and a fee assessed applicable to the reduced load. After the second week, no fee adjustment is made for “drops.” If a refund is due, it will be net of all outstanding financial obligations to the Regents of the University of Michigan.

Cancellation

Students who register and THEN DECIDE NOT TO ATTEND must notify the Registrar’s Office in writing BEFORE the first day of the semester or they will be charged a portion of their tuition plus fees. The Registrar’s Office is located in Room 266, University Pavilion.

Disenrollment (Withdrawal)

Students may withdraw from the University (i.e., drop all courses) up to and including the last day of classes without petitioning the Academic Standards Committee. A notation to that effect is made on the transcript.

A disenrollment form must be completed when a student drops all classes during a particular semester. If a student has registered early for future semesters, a form must be completed for each semester from which the student wishes to disenroll. The disenrollment form is available in the Registrar’s Office; the effective date of the withdrawal is the date the form is received by the Registrar’s Office.

  1. During the Fall or Winter Semester a student who withdraws
    1. during the first or second week of classes is assessed a $50.00 withdrawal fee plus the Registration Fee.
    2. during the third through sixth week of classes is assesses one-half the tuition plus fees.
    3. after the sixth week of classes is assessed full tuition plus fees.
  2. During the Spring or Summer, a student who withdraws
    1. during the first or second week of classes is assessed a $50.00 withdrawal fee plus the Registration Fee.
    2. during the third week of classes is assessed one-half the tuition plus fees.
    3. after the third week of classes is assessed full tuition plus fees.
    4. from a class that extends over both the Spring and Summer Term, is assessed under the guidelines of (A).

Fee Appeal

Fee appeals are used to request exceptions to the existing refund policy under extenuating circumstances. The deadline for submitting a fee appeal is 60 days after the end of the semester being appealed. Information and fee appeal forms may be obtained from Cashiers/Student Accounts, 261 Pavilion.

University of Michigan Residency Classification Guidelines

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Purpose of the Residency Classification Guidelines

The University of Michigan enrolls students from 50 states and more than 120 countries. Residency Classification Guidelines have been developed to ensure that decisions about whether a student pays in-state or out-of-state tuition are fair and equitable and that applicants for admission or enrolled students who believe they are Michigan residents understand they may be required to complete an Application for Resident Classification and provide additional information to document their residency status.

Circumstances Under Which You Must File a Residency Application

  • If you claim Michigan resident status and any of the following circumstances apply, you must file an Application for Resident Classification and be approved to qualify for instate tuition:
  • you currently live outside the state of Michigan for any purpose, including, but not limited to, education, volunteer activities, military service, travel, employment.
  • you have attended or graduated from a college outside the state of Michigan.
  • you have been employed or domiciled outside the state of Michigan within the last three years.
  • you are not a U.S. citizen or Permanent Resident Alien (if you are a Permanent Resident Alien, you must have a Permanent Resident Alien card).
  • your spouse, partner, or parent is in Michigan as a nonresident student, medical resident, fellow, or for military assignment or other temporary employment.
  • you are 24 years of age or younger and a parent lives outside the state of Michigan.
  • you are 24 years of age or younger and have attended or graduated from a high school outside the state of Michigan.
  • you have attended or graduated from an out-of-state high school and have been involved in educational pursuits for the majority of time since high school graduation.
  • you previously attended any U-M campus (Ann Arbor, Dearborn, or Flint) as a nonresident.

Other circumstances may also require you to file a residency application. The University reserves the right to audit prospective or enrolled students at any time regarding eligibility for resident classification and to reclassify students who are classified incorrectly.

How to File a Residency Application

Residency applications and in-person assistance are available at the Residency Classification Office, University of Michigan Office of the Registrar, LSA Building, 500 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-1382, phone (734) 764-1400. Business hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Applications can also be downloaded at ro.umich.edu/residency-application.pdf. Completed applications should be submitted to the Residency Classification Office.

FILING DEADLINES
September 30 for Fall Term
January 31 for Winter Term
July 31 for Spring, Spring/Summer, and Summer Terms

Applications must be received in the Residency Classification Office by 5 p.m. on the deadline date.

The deadline date is always after the first day of classes of the term in which you are enrolling and seeking residency.

If the deadline falls on a weekend, it will be extended to the next business day.

These deadlines apply to all U-M schools, colleges, and campuses. For the On-Job/On-Campus program only, filing deadlines are 30 calendar days after the first scheduled day of classes of the term applied for.

You may apply for resident classification for any term in which you are enrolled or intend to enroll.

Late applications will be assessed a nonrefundable $300 late fee and will be accepted up to the last published day of classes of the term for which you are applying. Late applications received after the last day of classes will be processed for the following term. In all cases, decisions will be based only on those facts that are in place by the original filing deadline for the term under consideration.

Required Documents

Along with the completed Application for Resident Classification form, you must submit the following:

  • for all applicants: copies of your driver’s license and the license(s) of the person or persons upon whom you are basing your claim to resident eligibility.
  • for all applicants: copies of the front and signature pages of the most recent year’s federal and state income tax returns and W2 forms for you and the person or persons upon whom you are basing your claim to resident eligibility.
  • for applicants born outside the U.S.: verification of U.S. citizenship or visa status.
  • for applicants who are dependents (see Residency Classification Guideline B-1 below): copies of the front and signature pages of your parents’ most recent year’s federal and state income tax returns with accompanying W2 forms.
  • for applicants whose claim to eligibility for resident classification is based on permanent, full-time employment for themselves, a spouse, partner, or parent: a letter from the employer, written on letterhead (including phone number), stating the position, status, and dates of employment. In addition to the letter, provide a copy of the most recent pay stub showing Michigan taxes being withheld.
  • for all applicants: any other documentation that supports your claim to resident eligibility.

The Residency Classification Office may also request additional documentation after the initial review of your application. Applications and accompanying documentation will be retained by the University of Michigan in accordance with its policies and procedures. All information will be kept confidential to the extent permitted by law.

In making residency determinations, the University considers all information provided in or with an application, as well as any other available information relevant to the application. Decisions to approve a residency application are made when the applicant has presented clear and convincing evidence that a permanent domicile in the state of Michigan has been established.

The University of Michigan’s Authority to Establish Residency Guidelines for Its Students

Because each of Michigan’s public universities has autonomous authority to establish residency guidelines for admission and tuition purposes, guidelines vary by school and are independent of regulations used by other state authorities to determine residency for such purposes as income and property tax liability, driving, and voting. The University of Michigan’s current Residency Classification Guidelines were approved by its Board of Regents to take effect Spring Term 2005 and to apply to students at all campuses.

The Board of Regents has authorized the Residency Classification Office in the Office of the Registrar on the Ann Arbor campus to administer the University’s residency guidelines. If your activities and circumstances as documented to the Residency Classification Office demonstrate establishment of a permanent domicile in Michigan, you will be classified as a resident once your eligibility has been confirmed. If your presence in the state is based on activities or circumstances that are determined to be temporary or indeterminate, you will be classified as a nonresident.

Our Residency Classification Guidelines explain how you can document establishment of a permanent domicile in Michigan. To overcome a presumption of nonresident status, you must file a residency application and document that a Michigan domicile has been established. Eligibility criteria are explained in more detail in the sections that follow. Meeting the criteria to be placed in an “eligible” category does not mean that you will automatically be classified a resident. If you have had any out-of-state activities or ties, or if the University otherwise questions your residency status, you will need to confirm your eligibility to be classified as a resident by filing an Application for Resident Classification in a timely manner and by providing clear and convincing evidence that you are eligible for resident classification under the following Guidelines.

A. General Residency Guidelines

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1. Circumstances that may demonstrate permanent domicile

The following circumstances and activities, though not conclusive or exhaustive, may lend support to a claim to eligibility for resident classification if all other applicable Guidelines are met:

  • both parents/parents-in-law (in the case of divorce, one parent/parent-in-law) permanently domiciled in Michigan as demonstrated by permanent employment in the state, establishment of a primary household in Michigan, and severance of out-of-state ties. Applicant must also show severance of out-of-state ties.
  • applicant employed in Michigan in a full-time, permanent position, provided that the applicant’s employment is the primary purpose for his or her presence in the state and that out-of-state ties have been severed. If the applicant is married or has a partner, the employment must be the primary purpose for the family’s presence in Michigan.
  • spouse or partner employed in Michigan in a full-time, permanent position, provided that the employment of the spouse or partner is the primary purpose for the family’s presence in the state and that out-of-state ties have been severed.

2. Circumstances that do not demonstrate permanent domicile

The circumstances and activities listed below are temporary or indeterminate and do not demonstrate permanent domicile. Individuals whose presence in Michigan and claim to Michigan resident status are based solely on one or more of the following are not eligible for resident classification:

  • enrollment in high school, community college, or university.
  • participation in a medical residency program, fellowship, or internship.
  • employment that is temporary or short-term or of the type usually considered an internship or apprenticeship.
  • employment of the spouse or partner of an individual who is in Michigan for temporary pursuits.
  • employment in a position normally held by a student.
  • military assignment in Michigan for the applicant or the applicant’s spouse, partner, or parent (see section D for special military provision).
  • payment of Michigan income tax and/or filing of Michigan resident income tax returns.
  • presence of relatives (other than parents).
  • ownership of property or payment of Michigan property taxes.
  • possession of a Michigan driver’s license or voter’s registration.
  • possession of a Permanent Resident Alien visa.
  • continuous physical presence for one year or more.
  • statement of intent to be domiciled in Michigan.

B. Additional Requirements, Definitions, and Special Circumstances

Even if one or more of the following circumstances applies to you, you may still need to file an application for resident classification. If you have had any out-of-state activity or have any out-of-state ties, you must submit an Application for Resident Classification by the filing deadline to request resident classification and confirm your eligibility. You must document that you meet all of the following applicable criteria to be eligible for resident classification and payment of in-state tuition.

1. Immigrants and Aliens

You must be entitled to reside permanently in the United States to be eligible for resident classification at the University. However, like U.S. citizens, you must also show you have established a Michigan domicile as defined in these Guidelines. The Residency Classification Office will review Applications for Resident Classification if you are in one of the following immigrant categories. You must provide official documentation showing your status.

  • Permanent Resident Aliens (Must be fully processed and approved and possess Permanent Resident Alien card or stamp in a passport verifying final approval by filing deadline for applicable term.)
  • Refugees (I-94 card or passport must designate “Refugee”.)
  • Asylees (I-94 card or passport must designate “Asylee”.)
  • A, E, G and I visa holders (Exception: Dependent children who hold an E visa are not eligible to be considered for resident classification.)

*Please note that individuals holding temporary visas, such as, but not limited to, F, H, J, K, Parolee, TN, TD, etc., are not eligible for resident classification at the University of Michigan regardless of their other circumstances.

2. Dependent Students

For University of Michigan residency classification purposes, you are presumed to be a dependent of your parents if you are 24 years of age or younger and (1) have been primarily involved in educational pursuits, or (2) have not been financially selfsupporting through employment.

  1. Residents
    1. Dependent Student - Parents in Michigan. If your parents are domiciled in Michigan as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, you are presumed to be eligible for resident classification as long as you have not taken steps to establish a domicile outside of Michigan or any other action inconsistent with maintaining a domicile in Michigan.
    2. Dependent Student of Divorced Parents - One Parent in Michigan. If your parents are divorced, you are presumed to be eligible for resident classification if one parent is domiciled in Michigan as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, and if you have not taken steps to establish an independent domicile outside of Michigan or any other action inconsistent with maintaining a domicile in Michigan.
    3. Dependent Resident Student Whose Parents Leave Michigan. If you are a student living in Michigan and permanently domiciled in the state as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines, you are presumed to retain resident status eligibility if your parents leave the state provided: (1) you have completed at least your junior year of high school prior to your parents’ departure, (2) you remain in Michigan, enrolled full-time in high school or an institution of higher education, and (3) you have not taken steps to establish a domicile outside Michigan or any other action inconsistent with maintaining a domicile in Michigan.
  2. Nonresidents

The University presumes you are a nonresident if you are a dependent student and your parents are domiciled outside the state of Michigan (See exception under a-i and a-ii for married dependent students whose parents in-law are domiciled in Michigan.

3. Michigan Residents and Absences From the State

You may be able to retain your eligibility for resident classification under the conditions listed below if you are domiciled in Michigan as defined by University Residency Classification Guidelines and leave the state for certain types of activities. However, if you have been absent from the state, you must file an Application for Resident Classification by the appropriate filing deadline to request resident classification and demonstrate your eligibility

  1. Absence for Active Duty Military Service (U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Officers in the Public Health Service), Non-Administrative Missionary Work, Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, or Similar Philanthropic Work
    If you are domiciled in Michigan at the time of entry into active military duty, missionary work, Peace Corps, or similar service, you are presumed to retain your eligibility for resident classification as long as you are on continuous active duty or in continuous service and continuously claim Michigan as the state of legal residence for income tax purposes. If you are a dependent child of such an individual, you are presumed to be eligible for resident classification provided: (1) you are coming to the University of Michigan directly from high school or have been continuously enrolled in college since graduating from high school, and (2) you have not claimed residency for tuition purposes elsewhere.
  2. Absence Due to Temporary Foreign Assignment
    If you are a dependent student domiciled in Michigan with your parents immediately preceding an absence for a temporary foreign assignment with a parent’s Michigan employer, you may retain your eligibility for resident classification provided (1) your family members hold temporary visas in the foreign country, and (2) you return directly to Michigan and remain in the state for educational purposes after leaving the foreign country.
  3. Temporary Absence of Less Than One Year
    If you are independently domiciled in Michigan immediately preceding a temporary absence of less than one year, you are presumed to retain eligibility for resident classification provided that out-of-state ties are severed upon your return to Michigan.

C. The Appeal Process

If you filed an Application for Resident Classification and were denied by the Residency Classification Office, you have recourse to an appeal process by filing a written appeal within 30 calendar days of the denial.

The Board of Regents established the Residency Appeal Committee to review decisions made by the Residency Classification Office. The Appeal Committee is chaired by the Vice President and Secretary of the University and includes two other University administrators, a faculty member, and a student. The Residency Coordinator and other staff members in the Residency Classification Office are not members of the Appeal Committee.

Appeals, which must be in writing, should be submitted to the Residency Classification Office. Please note that the written appeal must be received by the Residency Classification Office within 30 calendar days of the date on the denial letter. If the deadline falls on a weekend or University holiday, it will be extended to the next business day. If there is additional information you would like the Residency Appeal Committee to consider beyond the materials you have already submitted, you should submit that additional information, in writing, with appropriate supporting documentation, when you submit your written appeal. Your request and any additional information and documentation you provide will be forwarded to the Residency Appeal Committee with your original file.

All communications to the Residency Appeal Committee must be in writing. Personal contact with a member of the Committee could disqualify the member from participating in the decision regarding your residency. The Residency Appeal Committee does not meet in person with students, and appearances on behalf of students are not permitted at appeal meetings. After the Appeal Committee has completed its deliberations, you will receive the Committee’s final decision in writing. This will conclude the appeal process for the term covered by the application. The University will not conduct any further review of the decision.

D. Special Provision for Active Duty Military Personnel Assigned to Michigan

Regular active duty military personnel who are on assignment in Michigan, as well as their accompanying spouses and dependent children, will be allowed to pay in-state tuition while they attend the University of Michigan, even though they will not be eligible to be classified as residents under the Residency Classification Guidelines. This provision applies to persons in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard, and to officers in the Public Health Service. In order to request this special consideration, the student must submit a residency application by the applicable filing deadline and provide documentation demonstrating eligibility.

Warning: Misrepresentation or Falsification of Information Can be Costly

Individuals who provide false or misleading information or omit relevant information in an application for admission or for resident classification, or any other document related to residency eligibility, may be subject to legal or disciplinary measures. Students who are improperly classified as residents based on such information will have their residency classification changed and may be retroactively charged nonresident tuition for the period of time they were improperly classified.

QUESTIONS?

For questions on Residency Regulations, please contact:

Residency Classification Office
Office of the Registrar
1210 LSA Building
500 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382
Phone: (734) 764-1400

Office of the Registrar
266 University Pavilion
Flint MI 48502
Phone: (810) 762-3344

Financial Aid

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277 University Pavilion
(810) 762-3444
Web address: www.umflint.edu/finaid

Director: Lori Vedder

Financial Aid Officers: Sue Byrnes, Susan DeGalan, Shawn Griffin, Linda Grimshaw, Kelli Hoppe, Mary Horgan, Louanne Snyder, D. Eric Walker

The Office of Financial Aid administers federal, state, private and institutional financial aid programs that allow all interested students to afford the quality education offered by the University of Michigan-Flint. The Office of Financial Aid is committed to meeting the financial needs of all students, and to recognizing and supporting merit and achievement.

Eligibility for Financial Aid

Applicants must establish their eligibility to apply for financial aid by meeting several general requirements.

  1. The applicant must be admitted to a degree-granting program. Guest Students and Non-Candidate for Degree (NCFD) students are generally not eligible to receive financial aid.
  2. The applicant must be a U.S. citizen or hold a Permanent Resident Visa.
  3. The applicant must be registered with Selective Service (if required).
  4. The applicant must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  5. An applicant in default on any Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Direct Stafford Loan, or Federal PLUS Loan or who owes a refund on a Federal Pell Grant or a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant at any institution is not considered eligible for aid. The applicant must provide proof that the indebtedness and/or default status has been removed before the applicant can be considered for additional assistance. If an applicant owes any type of past debt to the University, then the applicant must resolve the financial obligation to the University before being considered for any type of financial aid or loan through the Office of Financial Aid.

Application Procedures and Materials

All applicants must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA collects information on the parents’ and/or student’s income, assets and benefits. These factors are all considered in determining the applicant’s need for aid. No processing fee is required. Students must list the University of Michigan-Flint as a college choice with the Title IV code of 002327. Allow at least three weeks for the FAFSA to be processed. An Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is calculated by the federal processor and is used to determine the applicant’s eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant and for all other types of aid. Financial aid offers are not automatically renewed. Students who wish to apply for aid must do so each year as soon after January 1 as possible. All students should apply electronically at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Both students and a parent if applicable need to apply for a federal PIN prior to filing the FASFA. The assigned PIN acts an electronic signature for both the student and parent on the FASFA form. Separate PINs must be obtained in order for the FAFSA to be processed. Due to the nature and funding levels of some federal, state and university funds, students are encouraged to apply by posted deadlines to avoid chances of funds being exhausted.

Notification of Award

Students are notified of their financial aid award within two weeks of the time the school receives the results of the FAFSA. Students selected for verification by the federal processor will receive an estimated award letter along with a list of documents needed to complete their file. The Office of Financial Aid will perform verification when all required documents have been received. If the amount of the award changes from what was originally estimated, a revised award letter will be sent. Continuing students will receive all award letter notification through their UM-Flint email account. New UM-Flint students will receive their first award notice through the regular mail system.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain eligible for financial aid, all students must make Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward their degree. Federal law establishes three standards for SAP requirements. To meet these requirements, students at the University of Michigan-Flint must meet the following standards:

  1. Students may receive financial aid for the first one hundred eighty hours attempted as an undergraduate. Transfer students will be evaluated by adding their transfer hours together; they can then receive aid up to the remainder of one hundred eighty hours. Graduate students may receive financial aid for the first 59 hours attempted as a graduate.
  2. Students must receive a passing grade in at least 67% of the attempted credit hours in which they enroll on a cumulative basis (See “Attempted hours include” below).
  3. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 by the end of semester four and maintain the 2.0 for the duration of their eligibility. This standard will be monitored and enforced as described in this Catalog regarding academic policies on academic standing.

Any student who fails to meet standard number two will be put on probation. The student’s eligibility will be terminated if the deficiency is not corrected by the end of the probationary period

Students put on probation will be told specifically what will be required to keep their eligibility. Students who are terminated have the right to file an appeal based on such circumstances as illness, injury, or the death of a family member that have prevented the student from meeting standards, and will be informed of the appeal process.

Attempted hours include the following credit hours:

  • Successfully completed (with passing grades)
  • Non-passing grades (i.e., N, F, E, I, *)
  • Retakes
  • Dropped classes after the add/drop period
  • Disenrollment from a semester (W)

Return of Title IV Funds

When students receiving Federal Title IV financial aid disenroll from all classes, the Office of Financial Aid must calculate how much aid they are entitled to keep. Students who disenroll before 60% of a semester is completed are entitled to keep a percentage of their award equal to the percentage of the semester they have completed. Students who disenroll after 60% of the semester has been completed are eligible to keep their entire award.

In some cases, students must repay a portion of the aid they have received. Repayment arrangements must be made to remain eligible for aid, and to re-enroll in subsequent semesters. In other cases, a refund may be due the student. If there is a refund of tuition due at the time of disenrollment, this will affect the amount of the repayment or refund. When possible, the Office of Financial Aid will return refunds to Federal Title IV loan programs, reducing the student’s loan indebtedness.

Private, state of Michigan, and University of Michigan funds are not subject to the same pro-ration formula. These funds will be adjusted based on the amount of charges the student owes after the Federal Title IV calculation has been completed.

Students granted a fee appeal are subject to the same rules listed above. Students completing a fee appeal based on non-attendance of all their courses for a given semester will not be entitled to any of their financial aid received. All funds previously received will be removed from a student’s account if a fee appeal is granted for non-attendance.

Students who fail to disenroll from a semester and whose record shows all unsuccessful grades (i.e., N, F, E, I, *) will be subject to a Title IV refund after the semester ends. The calculation will be based on the last date of documented attendance by the University or the 50% point of the semester. Students in this situation will be notified in writing and will have 14 business days to respond.

Student Budgets

The standard budgets used to determine a student’s financial need are constructed in accordance with federal guidelines, including costs for tuition and books, standard room and board allowance, personal and miscellaneous expenses, transportation costs, and a dependent care allowance for those applicants with children who require child care. The budget for an independent student with dependents, including a spouse, reflects the educational costs related only to the student. Exceptionally high, required expenses may be included in your budget; submit documentation of the expenses and an explanation to the Office of Financial Aid.

A student should notify the Office of Financial Aid if there is a change in financial circumstances for the academic year. Such circumstances could be a death, separation or divorce, loss of a full-time job, or loss of non-taxable income or benefits.

Available Aid

Most student financial aid authorized by the Office of Financial Aid is based upon need. The amount of financial aid is determined by comparing the budget to the applicant’s resources. If the combined resources are less than the student budget, every effort is made to help meet the deficit through some combination of the three forms of aid available: gift aid, long-term loans, and employment.

Sources of Financial Aid

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Federal Pell Grant: All undergraduate students applying for aid are required to apply for this federal grant. The amount of Federal Pell Grant funds that a student receives is based on the number of credit hours the student enrolls for and his or her Expected FamilyContribution as determined by the Federal Methodology needs analysis formula.

Federal Loan Programs: The following is a brief description of each type of loan, and the eligibility requirements. For all of the loan programs, a student must be enrolled at least half-time to receive any loan funds. Half-time for undergraduate students is a minimum of 6 credit hours and a minimum of 5 credit hours for graduate students. Detailed information concerning the loan maximums, completing the promissory note, deferment provisions, and the current interest rate on the loan programs is available from the Office of Financial Aid.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan: A need based, low interest loan for students. The amount that a student may borrow is based on his or her grade level and amount of financial need. The annual loan maximums based on the student’s grade level are as follows: Grade level 1 - $3500; Grade level 2 - $4500; Grade level 3-5 - $5500; Graduate students - $8500. The interest rate is variable with a cap of 8.25% and is paid by the federal government as long as the student is enrolled at least half time.  Repayment of the loan begins six months after the borrower ceases to be a half-time student. A 2.5% (percent subject to change) origination fee is deducted from the approved loan amount prior to disbursement.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan: A non-need based loan for students. A student must apply for a subsidized Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loan before requesting an unsubsidized loan. The combination of subsidized and unsubsidized loans borrowed may not exceed the student costs and the annual limits of the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. In addition to the subsidized loan maximums listed above, students considered to be Independent can apply for additional amounts through the unsubsidized program as follows: Grade level 1 - $4,000; Grade level 2 - $4,000; Grade level 3-5 - $5,000; Graduate students - $12,000. The interest rate is variable with a cap of 8.25% and is the borrower’s responsibility. A 2.5% (percent subject to change) origination fee is deducted from the approved loan amount prior to disbursement.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan: A non-need based loan that is available to the parents of dependent students. The parent borrower must have a favorable credit history. The amount that a parent may borrow is based on the student’s educational costs, minus any other financial aid received. The student does not need to apply for other types of need based financial aid, but is encouraged to do so. The interest rate is variable with a cap of 9% and must be paid by the parent. Repayment of the loan begins on the date of disbursement. A 4% (percent subject to change) origination fee is deducted from the approved loan prior to disbursement. Note: If a parent is denied a PLUS Loan due to an unfavorable credit decision from the Direct Loan Servicer, the Dependent student can access the higher amounts available to Independent students through the Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program listed above.

Federal Perkins Loans: Long-term, low interest loans available to students who are enrolled at least half-time. These loans are repayable over an extended period of time after graduation and carry no interest charge while the borrower is enrolled at least half-time. The current interest rate is 5%. Work-Study Program: Financial assistance through employment on campus or with certain nonprofit off-campus agencies. Student wages are met by a combination of Federal, State and University funds.

Michigan Competitive Scholarships: Awarded by the Michigan Department of Education. The scholarships are based on academic requirements and financial need. Students must initially qualify for the scholarship before enrolling as college freshmen. The scholarship is renewable for a maximum of ten semesters, with renewal based on continued need and satisfactory academic progress. Recipients must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year prior to the State of Michigan deadline of March 1. High school students should consult their counselors for details, preferably early in the junior year. High school graduates wishing additional information should visit: MI-StudentAid.org or call 1-888-4-GRANTS.

Michigan Educational Opportunity Grant Program (MEOG): A state program that provides grants to undergraduate students with financial need. Awards up to a maximum of $1000 per year are made to Michigan residents who are at least half-time students.

Michigan Adult Part-Time Grant Program (APTG): A state funded grant program for self-supporting undergraduate part-time students who are Michigan residents and have been out of high school for at least two years. Maximum awards of $600 per year are based on financial need. Students may receive this grant for a maximum of two years. Very limited annual funding is available.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA): Higher education scholarships based on need. Applicants must be accepted for enrollment in an accredited degree-granting institution of higher education and be either members of or eligible for membership in a recognized tribe. Applicants should contact the appropriate tribe, or for additional information contact the Michigan Agency, B.I.A. at 1- 202-208-6123.

Public Act 505 of 1978: North American Indians who can prove one-quarter quantum Indian blood and who attend a state supported post-secondary institution in Michigan shall have their tuition waived. A student must have been a legal resident of Michigan for at least 12 consecutive months. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid each semester of the number of credit hours they plan to take. Additional information and service is available from:

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan
MITWP
405 East Easterday Avenue Sault Ste.
Marie, Michigan 49783

Police Officer’s and Fire Fighter’s Survivor Tuition Act, Public Act 295 of 1996: Provides for the waiver of tuition at public community and junior colleges and state universities for the surviving spouse and children of Michigan police officers and fire fighters killed in the line of duty.

Emergency Loans: Available for enrolled students having temporary short-term financial problems. These loans are interest free.With documentation of the emergency situation, the loan can usually be granted the day following application; however, in some cases a weekly committee review is required. Repayment is expected in the semester in which the loan is received.

Further Information

Since legislative and other decisions affecting the regulations, procedures and funding of an assistance program often occur on short notice; Catalog information about financial aid must be kept general. The most up-to-date information is available in the Office of Financial Aid, Room 277 University Pavilion or online at www.umflint.edu/finaid. Please feel free to call or make an appointment if you are seeking specific information.

Documentation regarding the accreditation status of the University of Michigan-Flint is available in the Office of the Provost, Room 229, University Pavilion.

Scholarships and Awards

Financial Aid Office
277 University Pavilion
(810) 762-3444
www.umflint.edu/finaid

Several scholarships are available to recognize and support academic excellence, activities, service to the university or community, and student research. Some scholarships are open to a wide spectrum of students, while others have specialized criteria. Questions regarding eligibility, scholarship guidelines, and the application process and deadlines should be directed to the Financial Aid Office. A full listing and general descriptions may be accessed online at www.umflint.edu/finaid.

Music Scholarships

All scholarship recipients must meet standards set by the faculty of the Music Department

Bonnie Blum Memorial Scholarship: Awarded to junior or senior students with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5. The applicant must show merit and evidence of a strong commitment to music education.

Chandler B. Brownell Piano Scholarship:Awarded to full-time students majoring in piano with at least a 3.0 GPA. Preference given to residents of Genesee County. Financial need may be considered.

Department of Music/Art Instrumental Jazz Scholarship: A $350.00 scholarship will be awarded to one incoming freshman for the Fall semester of each academic year. Upon fulfillment of the applicable guidelines, this scholarship will be renewable for an additional three consecutive semesters. Application is open to all incoming freshmen, regardless of intended major. Applicants must have a minimum recomputed 2.7 high school GPA. Auditions are required.

Garrett E. Ebmeyer Trumpet Scholarship: Open to any music education trumpet student, based on performance and musical ability.

Janet Kay Evans Memorial Scholarship Fund: For full-time music students who demonstrate academic accomplishment and musical ability. A minimum 3.0 GPA and participation in a performance group are required. Financial need is considered.

Founding Faculty/Friends of Music Scholarship: For fulltime students pursuing a major in music or music education. A minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA or 3.0 GPA for the previous semester is required. Applicants must submit a cover letter indicating music specialty, participation in performance groups, and academic and career goals. Two letters of reference are required. Applicants are evaluated on performance in classes and rehearsals and overall contribution to the Music Department.

The Douglas E. Larmor Memorial Scholarship: Established by friends in conjunction with the Flint Federation of Musicians - Local 542 for full-time students who are instrumental music majors. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. Selection is based on auditions and financial need.

Music Department Scholarships: For students with a minimum 3.0 GPA who have received no grade in applied music lower than a “B” and who participate in a large performance group appropriate to their major instrument. Students must demonstrate continued commitment to their studies and the University.

Music Department Stipends: May be offered to students who are active and supportive members of ensembles in the department. Students must prepare their individual parts to the best of their ability and must attend all rehearsals and concerts outlined by the conductor.

Multicultural Music Initiative Scholarship: For full-time students with a declared major or minor in music or music education who are members of a UM-Flint Music Department performance ensemble. Auditions are required. Preference is given to African-American and Hispanic students with demonstrated aptitude and skills in music.

Joyce R. Piper Endowed Memorial Piano Scholarship: Applicants must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA, and participate in a UM-Flint Music Department audition. One scholarship will be awarded each academic year. Scholarships may be renewed; however, scholarship recipients must reapply.

Guy L. Stoppert Memorial Scholarship Fund: Established in 1989 by the trustees of the Guy L. Stoppert Memorial Fund and the Michigan Male Chorus Association. For currently enrolled male vocal students with a minimum 2.75 GPA.

Physical Therapy Student Assistance

Financial assistance to students admitted to the professional preparation program may be provided by prospective employers of physical therapy graduates in exchange for commitments for employment for specific periods after graduation. All awards and other arrangements are made directly between the grantor and the student. Some require faculty recommendations. Other awards are available without employment conditions. A list and description of all opportunities available can be obtained from the Physical Therapy Department.

Ralph M. and Emmalyn E. Freeman Physical Therapy Scholarship: For physical therapy majors with minimum 3.5 GPA.

Virginia Wilson Memorial Scholarship: Applicant must be a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and meet the minimum academic standards as defined by the Physical Therapy Department. Demonstrated history of service to the profession, MPT, or community.

Coleman J. Ross Jr. and Lois R. Ross Scholarship: For students in the final year of the professional preparation program in physical therapy. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Financial need is considered. For additional information, contact the Physical Therapy Department.

Theatre Department Scholarships

The theatre scholarship program is designed to attract and retain students of exceptional talent and promise and to enable these students to pursue a theatre degree without financial hardship. Students should contact the Theatre Department for additional information and to set up appointments for auditions and interviews.

Theatre Department Scholarship: Offered to new and continuing theatre majors based on satisfactory progress in both theatre activities and general university studies.

Ralph M. and Emmalyn E. Freeman Theatre Scholarship: For full-time theatre majors with a minimum 3.2 GPA. Recipients must participate in at least one UM-Flint main stage performance per term.

Honor Grant: For theatre majors with a GPA of 3.35 or better based on previous semester academic record. Amount based on available funds.

Brian McDonald Scholarship Fund: For Theatre majors with a minimum 3.25 GPA for freshmen and a 3.0 GPA for currently enrolled students. Financial need is a consideration.

Carl and Sarah Morgan Theatre Scholarship: Provides scholarship assistance to talented students majoring in theatre. Awarded yearly to full-time students who have maintained a minimum 2.75 GPA and who make significant contributions to the Theatre Department’s programs. Fulfillment of a community service project is also a requirement. Contact the Theatre Department for additional information.

Wendy Frost-LaFontaine Memorial Scholarship in Physical Therapy: Applicant must be enrolled in their final year of the professional DPT degree program. Applicant must be a resident of the state of Michigan, and must show a desire to practice in the state of Michigan. Applicant must be assigned to any Genesys Health System during Clinical Education II. Must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the DPT degree program. Refer to Physical Therapy Department to apply.

Ernestine R. Smith, Ph.D. MPH Physical Therapy Scholarship: Available to second and third year UM-Flint Physical Therapy students who have a B+ GPA. Scholarship applicants must submit a minimum one page cover letter in which they state their career goals, identify their involvement and specific interest in patience care and demonstrated commitment to the physical therapy program. Refer to Physical Therapy Department to apply.

University Honors Scholar Program Scholarships

Students of superior academic ability compete for acceptance into these two- or four-year programs. All Honors Program students receive scholarships not based on financial need provided they continue to satisfy the program’s rigorous standards. Interested entering and currently enrolled freshmen or students transferring to the University of Michigan-Flint should obtain details from:

Director of the Honors Program
Room 517, David M. French Hall
University of Michigan-Flint
Flint, Michigan 48502-2186
(810) 424-5463

Extended Hours Program

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Normal business hours for the University of Michigan-Flint are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. throughout the year.

The following departments have extended business hours, Monday through Thursday, with normal business hours from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, throughout the year. Please check with the units for their hours of operation.

Academic Advising and Career Center, Room 285 University Pavilion
Admissions, Room 245 University Pavilion
Bookstore, Room 106 University Pavilion
Financial Aid, Room 277 University Pavilion
Graduate Programs, Room 251 Thompson Library
Information Technology Services, Room 207 MSB
Library, Thompson Library*
Mediated Classroom Services, Room 457 FH*
Microcomputer Labs: 206 MSB & 223 FH*
Recreation Center
Registrar, Room 266 University Pavilion
School of Health Professions and Studies, Room 402 MSB
Student Development Center, Room 264 University Center
Student Life, Room 375 University Center
Tutorial Services, Room 264 University Center
Writing Center, Room 559 FH*

FH=French Hall (formerly Classroom Office Building)
MSB=Murchie Science Building
WSW=William S. White Building

*These units have hours that exceed the extended hours program.

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