Jul 15, 2020  
2010-2011 Catalog 
    
2010-2011 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    ADM 501 - Museum, Gallery & Performance Administration.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    First year survey.  Overview of primary areas of arts management: museums, galleries, grants, performance halls, box office programs, crew supervision and organizational structures. Lecture, discussion, research and writing.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 504 - Performance Aesthetics, Theory and Criticism.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Foundations in performance aesthetics, methods of evaluation and criticism and the intersection between performance and culture. Readings in philosophy and performance criticism, lecture, discussion, critical approaches to live performances. Topics include theatre, music and dance.  May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 505 - Visual Aesthetics, Theory and Criticism.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Foundations in visual aesthetics, methods of evaluation and criticism and the intersection between visual art and culture. Readings in visual art criticism, lecture, discussion, critical approaches to museum and gallery exhibits. Topics include areas in the visual arts.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 506 - Production Management and Grant Writing.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Methods in production management. Budgeting, scheduling, purchasing, grantsmanship, performance space preparation, technical and crew management and collaboration. Lecture, discussion, writing, and possible participation in management performance crews.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 507 - Art, Ethics and Community Service.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Social dimensions of the visual arts and foundations in ethical management of museums and galleries; contributions the arts make to the vitality of a community. Students plan service projects for community involvement. Readings in society and the arts, social demographics, lectures and discussions on the social impact of museum and gallery exhibits.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 508 - Marketing, Audience Development Box Office Management.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Analysis of marketing plans, audience development research, and box office management programs and methods. Emphasis on a combination of analysis and applied projects. Lecture, discussion and applied field work with performance programs.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 509 - Arts, Marketing and Grant Writing.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Methods in marketing and grantsmanship for museums and galleries. Regional and national trends in marketing and grant agencies; students develop models for marketing and draft grant applications for projects. Case Studies.May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 579 - Advance Museum and Gallery Management.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Methods of museum and gallery management with applied assignments.  Students compare methods and procedures and develop their own model for management approaches for museums and galleries. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 580 - Advanced Production Management.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Focus on advanced management methods including budgeting, crews, box office, performance spaces and grants, as well as management strategies and problem solving skills.  Lectures and applied field work with performance programs. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 590 - Independent Study in Administration.


    ADM 579  or ADM 580, consent of instructor.(3).

    The student explores a management area not addressed by either ADM or PUB courses, working with an advisor to formulate a project and complete it in one semester.  Research, writing, applied work or other project designed by the student and the advisor.
  
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    ADM 595 - Internship.


    ADM 579  or ADM 580 .(3).

    Internship with an arts organization.  Students work with professional supervision on projects assigned by internship organization.  Focus on development of applied management skills with off-campus assignments.  Applied field work with performance programs. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    ADM 599 - Seminar in Executive Arts Administration.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Final year course.  Exploration of advanced administration topics.  Each student develops an administration model for a selected area, and prepares a portfolio, aesthetics, marketing, grants, facility and crew management, and other topics pertinent to the student’s area of emphasis.  Lecture, discussion, writing and presentations. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits.
  
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    AFA 101 - Introduction to Africana Studies.


    (3)S.

    Interdisciplinary examination of the Africana (African and African Diaspora)experience; trends, issues and forces that have shaped it. The dispersion of persons of African American descent throughout the world, and the important roles they have played in the advancement of civilization.
  
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    AFA 200 - The History of Blues, Jazz and Rap.


    (3)H.

    Examination of the foundations for Jazz, Rock’n’Roll, Gospel Music, Soul, Rhythm and Blues as well as other popular forms of American music. Microcosm of American life in its portrait of Africana peoples’ experiences in America.Also listed as MUS 200 .
  
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    AFA 202 - African Music and Cultures.


    (3)H.

    Overview of the three types of music in Africa today: traditional, popular and written art music. Investigation of the diversity and shared characteristics of African cultures with reference to historical, social and cultural backgrounds of the music.Also listed as MUS 202 .
  
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    AFA 203 - Origins of Modern Racism.


    (3)GS/US.

    Survey of the development of modern Western ideas of racism in the period 1492-1800, with particular attention to moral and political philosophies that developed in conjunction with the colonization and enslavement of African and Native American peoples in the New World. Figures studied may include Columbus, Las Casas, Montaigne, Locks, Rousseau and Jefferson.May be used to satisfy general education or BA distribution requirements, but not both.Also listed as ANT 203  and PHL 203 .
  
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    AFA 204 - World Dance Forms.


    Sophomore standing; DAN 116 , DAN 117 , DAN 118 , or DAN 120 , DAN 121 , or DAN 130 , DAN 131 ; or consent of instructor.(2)GS.

    Movement and lecture course with emphasis on global cultures and their folk traditions through dance. Specific area of exploration determined a semester prior to course offering.Also listed as DAN 204  and INT 204 .
  
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    AFA 205 - African Religions and Philosophy.


    A course in philosophy numbered 100 or higher.(3)GS.

    Examination of some African religions and African philosophy, to gain greater insight and understanding of traditional African religions and African philosophy such as Yoruba and Akan. The role of these traditional African religions and philosophies in the lives of continental and diaspora Africans, as well as non-Africans.Also listed as ANT 205  and PHL 205 .
  
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    AFA 206 - Survey of African Literature.


    (3)H.

    Origins and development of contemporary African fiction, including the African oral heritage and works of selected writers from different African geographic regions. The unique role and the experiences of the writer in modern African societies; critical reception of African literature within and outside of the African continent; influences of colonialism, nationalism, and feminism/womanism are examined.Also listed as CPL 206  and ENG 209 .
  
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    AFA 207 - Modern African Drama and Poetry.


    (3)H.

    Introduction to contemporary African drama and poetry, whose themes reflect socio-cultural, political and religious events prevalent in the societies from which they emanate. The relationship between traditional and modern drama and poetry. Analysis of language in selected poems and plays, including works by Wole Soyinka, Ama Ata Aidoo, Tess Onwueme, Athol Fugard, Dennis Brutus, and Niyi Ozundare.Also listed as CPL 207  and THE 207 .
  
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    AFA 208 - Multicultural Drama.


    (3)H.

    Multicultural drama within the context of the modern theatre. Examination of diverse cultures that impact contemporary society. Assimilation, integration, and cultural identity focal areas of scrutiny in a Western context on non-western and western authors.Also listed as THE 208 .
  
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    AFA 213 - Gospel Choir.


    Consent of instructor and freshman or sophomore standing only.(1).

    Rehearsal and performance of works in the Gospel Music tradition.May be repeated for multiple credit.Also listed as MUS 213 .
  
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    AFA 215 - Survey of African-American Literature.


    Prior or concurrent election of ENG 112  or EHS 120 .(3)H/US.

    Introduction to American literature written by African-American writers. Major authors studied in historical context along with cultural elements of folklore and related arts.May be used to satisfy general education or BA distribution requirements, but not both.Also listed as ENG 215 .
  
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    AFA 216 - Afro/Latino/Caribbean Women Writers.


    Prior or concurrent election of ENG 112  or EHS 120 .(3)GS.

    Overview of the major genres, publishing activities, goals and concerns of female writers from the Anglophone, Francophone and Dutch Caribbean. The Caribbean Women Writers’ Project and the ways in which anticolonial discourse, issues of exile and sanctuary, and revisions of the literary tradition of the Caribbean are manifested in their literature.Also listed as WGS 216 .
  
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    AFA 219 - Psychology of the Black Experience.


    PSY 100  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Experience of Blacks examined from a psychological point of view. Focus on the psychological consequences of being Black in the United States; however, world-wide perspective included. Empirical and theoretical views.Also listed as PSY 219 .
  
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    AFA 220 - Africana Theories of Knowledge.


    (3).

    Basic issues arising in Africana epistemology and cosmologies. Introduction to critical thinking about various “knowledges” in an analytical and comparative manner. Use of qualitative research tools as means of generating African centered ways on knowing the world; African religions and philosophies.
  
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    AFA 230 - Survey of African History to 1800.


    (3)S.

    African history from ancient times to the end of the 18th century. Economic, political and social foundations of African civilizations. The diversity of African societies, their contacts with each other and with peoples and cultures outside the continent, the Atlantic slave trade and its consequences on Africa and people of African descent.Also listed as HIS 230 .
  
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    AFA 235 - Introduction to the History of African Diaspora.


    (3)GS.

    Key issues and events in the history of the African Diaspora.  Using “homeland plus diaspora” model, discussion of common origins and experiences of Africans and people of African descent in various parts of the globe and contributions of Africans to the multi-ethnic and cross-cultural societites in Asia, Europe and the Americas.Also listed as HIS 235 .
  
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    AFA 239 - Drama of the Harlem Renaissance.


    (3)H.

    Examination of the development of African American drama with emphasis on the major playwrights of the Harlem Renaissance. Exploration of the political, social, and racial climate addressed in their dramatic texts.Also listed as THE 239 .
  
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    AFA 240 - African Political Systems.


    (3).

    Examination of African political systems from the pre-colonial period to the present. Development of differing political systems in African countries with attention to African pre-colonial political systems, which included large empires governed by kings with near absolute power.
  
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    AFA 242 - Contemporary Black Theatre in America.


    (3)H.

    Contemporary Black dramas and dramatists in America since 1950, and the production of Black theatre in America today. Literature, sociology, mythology and music behind the plays studied; operation and recent flourishing of Black theatre in America. Attendance at performances and participation in performance activities may be required.Also listed as THE 242 .
  
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    AFA 244 - The Economics of the Black Community.


    (3).

    Economic problems of the Black American in the historical development of the United States. Analysis of discrimination in consumer, labor, housing, and capital markets. Importance of human resources in economic development. Discussion of ways to bring about economic change.
  
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    AFA 250 - African Cultures.


    (3).

    Introduction to the African continent as a geographic, political and symbolic entity juxtaposing territories, histories and cultures. Anthropological emphasis on West Africa, including matriliny and other lineage systems, polyrhythmic music, gender, religion (e.g., Vodu), economic and political organization, and colonial impact, from the viewpoints of Africans themselves, as subjects and agents.Also listed as ANT 250 .
  
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    AFA 257 - Protest in African Literature.


    At least sophomore standing.(3)H.

    Reading and discussion of poets, novelists, and essayists from West, East, and South Africa who have written in protest of French, English, Portuguese, and neocolonial oppression. Gender struggles and inequalities in indigenous systems. Analysis of cultural differences between African peoples and colonizing powers, as they are represented in literature and as they intersect with political and social realities; efforts to change them.Also listed as CPL 257 .
  
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    AFA 260 - African Diaspora in the Americas.


    ANT 100 /INT 100  or consent of instructor.(3)GS.

    Racialized groups and evolving black consciousness of African descendants in the Americas and the Atlantic World. Studies of race, racism, and anthropological social identities during the Atlantic slave trade and in contemporary global society. The relationship between philosophies of culture and historiography in the context of slavery, forced removals, and global economic and ontological hegemony.Also listed as ANT 260 .
  
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    AFA 265 - Caribbean Society and Culture.


    (3)GS.

    Introduction to social, political, economic and cultural life of the Caribbean, focusing on the English-speaking Caribbean while also addressing important lessons in the experiences of peoples from the wider Caribbean. Social-scientific disciplinary focus combining historical and thematic issues, with particular attention to problems of colonialism, race, inequality, and efforts towards democracy.Also listed as SOC 265 .
  
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    AFA 270 - Race and Ethnic Relations.


    SOC 100  or ANT 100 /INT 100 .(3)S/US.

    Analysis of the implications of racial differences, the factors affecting prejudice and discrimination, structural aspects of group conflicts, and the possibilities of change in American and other societies.May be used to satisfy general education or BA distribution requirements, but not both.Also listed as SOC 270 .
  
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    AFA 300 - Introduction to Francophone African Literature.


    ENG 112  or EHS 120 .(3)H.

    Introduction to Francophone African Literature. The Negritude (Movement) School and its impact on African Literature. Readings from the works of Leon-Gontran Damas, Birago Diop, Aime Cesaire, Leopold Sedar Senghor, and others.Also listed as CPL 301 .Graded ABCDN.
  
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    AFA 301 - Early African-American Literature.


    AFA 101 , AFA 260 .(3).

    African-American literary tradition as a long and connected enterprise of imaginative expression and revision. Overview of the genres and historical figures key to the development of the traditions of African-American writers.
  
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    AFA 304 - Black Social and Political Movements.


    AFA 101  or a course in political science or consent of instructor.(3).

    Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of past and current movements seeking social and political change on behalf of African-Americans, from an interdisciplinary perspective. The Civil Rights Movement, Back to Africa Movement, spiritual movements, resistance movements, and independent political movements.Also listed as POL 304 .
  
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    AFA 305 - Topics in African Languages and Cultures.


    AFA 101  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Cultural and language investigation of specific African, Caribbean, and Diaspora areas of the world. Language and cultural skills to enable travel to various African and/or Diaspora countries.Also listed as ANT 305 .Offered infrequently.
  
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    AFA 308 - African and African-American Art.


    At least sophomore standing.(3)H.

    Survey of Africa’s art history, from Stone Age to early 20th century; introduction to select group of African-American artists. Lectures, museum visits, hands-on projects, short research paper.Also listed as ARH 308 .
  
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    AFA 310 - Performance Traditions & Aesthetics of the African World.


    AFA 101  or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Development of Black performance theory and practice in the African world. Emphasis on theoretical foundations of Black Expression world wide.
  
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    AFA 311 - African World Performance Studio.


    Consent of instructor. AFA 310  recommended.(3)F.

    Practical aspects of artistic expression through drama, poetry, storytelling, music, dance, and some visual arts. A performance collective will be formed to showcase work of enrolled students.Also listed as THE 317 .
  
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    AFA 312 - Black Arts Movement.


    AFA 215  or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Examination of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and early 1970s. Study of the works of the black writers, poets and dramatists of the Arts Movement including those of Larry Neal, Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka, Harold Cruise, and Nikki Giovanni.Also listed as THE 312 .
  
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    AFA 313 - African-American Music.


    A course in Africana Studies or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Examination of the music developed and influenced by African-Americans in the United States. African-American music styles, forms and performance practices that were influenced by European music; African music retentions.Also listed as MUS 313 .
  
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    AFA 318 - Women Writers of the African World.


    (Formerly 218).Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Literature by women from Africa, the Caribbean and North America, including such writers as Buchi, Emecheta, Nawal El Saadawi, Edwidge Dandicat and Alice Walker, and experiences that inform their writings.  Examination of diverse ways depolyed by women to discuss issues relevant to them, as well as techniques and recurring motifs used in their works; grounded in feminist theory and the concept of womanism.Also listed as CPL 318  and WGS 318 .
  
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    AFA 320 - Contemporary East African History.


    AFA 230 /HIS 230  or consent of instructor.(3)GS.

    Contemporary political, economic, and social history of East Africa; historical background for major conflicts in the region.
  
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    AFA 321 - Twentieth Century African-American Literature.


    AFA 101 , AFA 260 .(3).

    Overview of the major genres, publishing activities, and concerns of twentieth century African-American writers and examination of at least two traditions in the development of the literature. Eras considered include pre-World War I, the Harlem Renaissance, the Urban Era, and contemporary literature.
  
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    AFA 322 - History of West Africa and the Atlantic World.


    AFA 230 /HIS 230  or AFA 335 /HIS 335  or consent of instructor.(3)GS.

    Political, social, and economic history of West Africa’s contact in the Atlantic world, from the 16th to the 19th centuries.
  
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    AFA 331 - Urban Education: Conflicts and Strategies for Change.


    At least junior standing.(3).

    Current social, economic, and educational conflicts affecting urban education in America. Intended to aid students in developing systematic individual strategies for change in urban education.
  
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    AFA 334 - History of Ethnicity and Race in the United States.


    At least junior standing; a course in US history; or consent of instructor.(3)US.

    Historical examination of the role of ethnicity and race in the United States with emphasis on changing patterns of immigration, the process of assimilation, the evolution of ethnicity, and differences and similarities in the experiences of ethnic and racial groups.Also listed as HIS 334 .
  
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    AFA 335 - History of the African-American to 1877.


    A course in American or African history.(3)S.

    African American experience from African origins to 1877. Pre-16th century African civilizations, the Atlantic slave trade, the middle passage, racial slavery during the colonial and early republic. Survival strategies of the enslaved and free, struggles for freedom, equality, and social justice during the colonial and post revolutionary period. The abolitionist movement; the role of African Americans in the Civil War and reconstruction. Lectures and documentary videos.Also listed as HIS 335 .
  
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    AFA 336 - Africa in Modern Times, 1800 to Present.


    (Formerly 231).(3)S.

    Coming of European colonialism to Africa in the late nineteenth century and the efforts of Africans to recapture their independence. Survey through the present period.Also listed as HIS 336 .
  
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    AFA 338 - Topics in African-American History.


    A course in American or African-American history.(3).

    A different topic taught each year.May be reelected once.Also listed as HIS 338 .
  
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    AFA 351 - United States Foreign Policies Towards Africa.


    At least sophomore standing.(3)GS.

    Exploration of U.S. Foreign policies in Africa since the post -1945 period to the present. Formerly low on the list of U.S. Foreign policy interests, as a continent where East-West tensions were often played out in the 1960s-1980s, Africa was also the continent where U.S. Foreign policy-making machinery was tested in the early days of a new world order.
  
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    AFA 352 - Women in Developing Countries.


    Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.(3).

    Examination of women’s lives in less developed countries, and the forces that shape them.  Introduction to a broad interdisciplinary and international literature focusing on issues related to women’s work, health, education, social, economic and political status and their property rights, within local, regional, national, and global contexts.
  
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    AFA 357 - The Black Church and the Civil Rights Movement.


    AFA 101  or AFA 220  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Sociopolitical, economic, philosophical and theological factors underlying the Modern Civil Rights Movement. Black religious institutions from the Great Depression; renewal and call to arms during the tumultuous era of the late 1950s and 1960s; development of today’s “Black Church.”
  
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    AFA 358 - The History of African-American Religion.


    Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.(3).

    Exploration of the core values associated with the struggle to create and maintain the African-American religious experience in America, which has borrowed values from a number of cultures and has served to influence the on-going process of defining American culture.Also listed as HIS 368 .
  
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    AFA 359 - The Black Family.


    SOC 100 .(3).

    Sociological and social-psychological analysis of the Black family in America. Impact of changes in race relations and of urbanization on the Black family. Assessment of various stereotypes existing in mass media and in sociological and psychological literatures.Also listed as SOC 359  and WGS 359 .
  
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    AFA 361 - Health Issues and Black Americans.


    AFA 101  or AFA 220 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Exploration of the status of the health care institution in the United States and the nature of response to demonstrated health needs of Black Americans.
  
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    AFA 362 - Politics and the Black Family in Modern America.


    AFA 101  or AFA 220 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Examination of racial politics, pluralism, and policymaking in contemporary America, as they affect the Black Family.
  
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    AFA 363 - Black Cultural Criticism.


    AFA 101  or AFA 220 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Exploration of the role social institutions play in shaping views and defining values of society as it relates to issues of race, class, gender, sexual orientation that permeate identities of Black and other marginalized people of the world.
  
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    AFA 364 - Conflicts and Conflict Resolutions in Africa.


    At least sophomore standing.(3)S.

    Investigation of major conflicts in Africa and efforts to have them resolved, by agencies within and outside Africa:  the African Union, Southern African Development Community (SADC), Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA), EU, UN, US, and other inter-governmental organizations, individual governments and non-governmental organizations.
  
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    AFA 369 - African Religions.


    AFA 101 , ANT 100 /INT 100  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Examination of African religions through anthropological and literary texts, including consideration of West African religions and central African indigenous practices.Also listed as ANT 369 .
  
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    AFA 373 - Institutional Racism.


    SOC 100  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Analysis of racism within the basic institutions of American society. Emphasis on the way institutional racism affects members of various ethnic minorities.Also listed as SOC 373 .
  
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    AFA 375 - Community Building through Educational Involvement.


    AFA 101  or ANT 100 /INT 100  or SOC 100  or SWR 100 ; at least junior standing; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Participation and observation in schools and community-based organizations, integrated with an interdisciplinary seminar on urban social issues and cultural variation. Skills required for various forms of community action; techniques include qualitative research methods, assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation.Also listed as EDS 361  and SWR 361 .
  
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    AFA 380 - Women in the African Experience.


    At least sophomore standing or consent of instructor.(3)GS.

    Survey of the history of African women with a focus on gender and the roles African women play in their societies and families.  Emphasis on the roles women play in the economy, polities, professions, education, health, environment, socio-cultural and religious life, wars and conflicts.Also listed as WGS 380 .
  
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    AFA 391 - Directed Readings in Africana Studies.


    At least sophomore standing and consent of instructor.(1-3).

  
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    AFA 395 - Topics in African Diaspora Studies.


    Consent of instructor.(3).

    Issues and problems in Africana Studies Topic in the social sciences announced for each offering of the course.May be reelected once.
  
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    AFA 396 - Topics in African Studies.


    Consent of instructor.(3).

    Issues in African studies. Topic in the social sciences announced for each offering of the course.May be reelected once.Graded ABCDE/Y.
  
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    AFA 399 - Africana Studies for Teachers.


    At least sophomore standing.(3)GS.

    Examination of stereotypes regarding Africans and people of African descent. Use of novels, personal projects and other documents for presentation of a more intimate picture of Africa, people of African descent and content knowledge of Africana Studies. Reliable resources educators can use to teach about Africa and the African Diaspora, whether in the classroom, the youth center, the home, or the church.
  
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    AFA 400 - 20th Century Major African Authors.


    At least junior standing, a course in literature, a course in African literature; or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Intensive study of works by important 20th century authors from different African countries, including Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe, Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Leepold Sedar Senghor, Nawal El Saadawi, Naguib Mahfouz, Dennis Brutus, Mariama Baa, Nadine Gordimer.. Focus on evolution of the author’s canon, impact on the literary context, relationship between imaginative creativity and biography, historical and cultural contexts.Also listed as CPL 400 .
  
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    AFA 413 - Gospel Choir.


    Consent of instructor, at least junior standing.(1).

    Rehearsal and performance of works in the Gospel Music tradition.May be repeated for multiple credit.Also listed as MUS 413 .
  
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    AFA 433 - Muslims in North America.


    (3).

    Origins, conditions, cultural practices, and conflicts of Muslims in North America. Examination of the critical issues of adaptation, authenticity, and diversity confronting Muslims in the United States and Canada, focusing on the different African-American Muslim communities, especially the “Nation of Islam.” Investigation of existing stereotypes of Muslims in contemporary popular culture, including novels, films and comics.Also listed as HIS 433 .
  
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    AFA 435 - Black America Since the Civil War.


    At least junior standing.(3).

    Examination of movements, organizations, personalities, and leadership trends among Black Americans since the Civil War.Also listed as HIS 435 .
  
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    AFA 475 - Study Tour of Africa/African Diaspora.


    AFA 230  or consent of instructor.(3).

    Exploration of cultures of Africa and/or African Diaspora through study tour of select areas. For students with concentrations or minors in Africana Studies and others interested in first-hand cultural and intellectual experiences in Africa and/or the African Diaspora.
  
  •  

    AFA 480 - Africa in 20th Century Anglophone World Literature.


    At least junior standing, a 300-level course in literature, a course in African literature; or consent of instructor.(3)H.

    Depictions of Africa in multiple world literary traditions, by renowned writers including Joseph Conrad, Joyce Cary, Toni Morrison, V.S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Nawal El Sadaawi, Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe, Nadine Gordimer, Dennis Brutus, and Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. Analysis of changing perspectives, from Africa as “other world” to contemporary visions of acceptance and identification; connections between literary works and their socio-political/ideological contexts.Also listed as CPL 480 .
  
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    AFA 490 - Seminar in Africana Studies.


    At least junior standing.(3)CAP.

    Research papers and assigned readings designed to integrate techniques and materials of previous Black study. Topic announced prior to registration.
  
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    AFA 495 - Honors Thesis I.


    Consent of the Honors Council or its designate; consent of Department Chair; Open only to Honors Program students in Africana Studies.(4).

    Credit and grade are not given until successful completion of HON 496 .Also listed as HON 495 .Graded ABCDE/Y.
  
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    AFA 496 - Honors Thesis II.


    Consent of the Honors Council or its designate; consent of Department Chair; prior or concurrent election of HON 495 . Open only to Honors Program students in Africana Studies.(4).

    Also listed as HON 496 .Graded ABCDE/Y.
  
  •  

    AFA 534 - History of Ethnicity and Race in the United States.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    See AFA 334  for description.  Not open to students with credit for AFA 334 /HIS 334 .Also listed as HIS 534 .
  
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    AFA 535 - Black America Since the Civil War.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    See AFA 435  for description.  Not open to students with credit for AFA 435 /HIS 435 .Also listed as HIS 535 .
  
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    AFA 599 - Africana Studies for Teachers.


    Graduate standing; AFA 331 .(3).

    See AFA 399  for description. Not open to students with credit for AFA 399 .
  
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    AGE 202 - Introduction to Gerontology.


    (Formerly HCR 202).ENG 112  or EHS 120 , SOC 100 .(3)S.

    Introduction to gerontology as a multidisciplinary field and profession. Characteristics of an aging population, myths and realities of aging. Examination of contemporary issues including elder abuse, elderly caregiver needs, bereavement and loss, and resilience in aging, and career opportunities in gerontology.
  
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    AGE 306 - Politics of Aging.


    (Formerly HCR 306).POL 120 .(3).

    Examination of political institutions and policy making processes that impact legislation affecting the aged, including legislators, interest groups, political parties, voters. Analysis of entitlement programs for the aged, including federal and state level regulation and implementation of Medicare, Medicaid, social security. Political attitudes of baby boomers and the aged toward the health care system.Also listed as POL 306 .
  
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    AGE 320 - Death, Dying and Bereavement.


    (Formerly HCR 314).SWR 100  or consent of instructor.(3)S.

    Death, dying and bereavement in the United States. Analysis of experiences of individuals at different stages of development in the human life cycle; social and cultural variables with American society affecting death-related encounters, attitudes and practices. Assessment of task-based approaches to coping and ritualistic practice.Also listed as SWR 320 .
  
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    AGE 338 - Social Work with The Aged.


    SWR 100  or consent of the instructor.(3)S.

    Forces and conditions that contribute to the recognition of aging as a problem in U.S. society, and resultant social welfare policies. Specific social work practice issues in casework, group work, and community organization in relationship to specific social provisions for elderly.Also listed as SWR 338 .
  
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    AGE 347 - Psychology of Aging.


     PSY 100 ; PSY 309  or PSY 313 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Examination of social, emotional and cognitive changes that are part of human aging.  Topics include interpersonal relationships, health issues, and successful adaptation to the environment.Also listed as PSY 347 .
  
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    AGE 350 - Health and Aging.


    (Formerly HCR 350).SOC 100 , at least junior standing.(3)HW.

    Relationships between health and aging. Definition of aging, historical and cross-cultural views of normal aging, profile of the aged, acute and chronic illness and its implications, health care services for the aged, importance of nutrition and exercise.
  
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    AGE 352 - Chronic Illness and Aging.


    (Formerly HCR 352).SOC 100 , at least junior standing.(3)HW.

    Overview of chronic diseases common in later years. Complex nature of chronic illness and disability, including social and psychological consequences for individual and family, and need for health and social services. Treatment and management of chronic illness. Emphasis on individuals’ and family members’ perspectives of chronic illness experience.
  
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    AGE 378 - Organization and Administration of Long-Term Care.


    (Formerly HCR 378).HCR 300 , HCR 376 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Types and functions of long-term care health organizations (e.g., nursing homes, hospitals, visiting nurses, clinics) and related providers. Students participate in a critical analysis of long-term care administration relating to reimbursement, resource use, monitoring, quality mechanisms, and ethical/legal issues.
  
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    AGE 388 - Directed Studies.


    Consent of instructor.(1-3).

    Directed research on a topic relevant to Aging/Gerontology, under instructor’s supervision, by special arrangement only. May be reelected.
  
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    AGE 475 - Biology of Aging.


    BIO 111 , BIO 113 , BIO 326 ; or consent of instructor.(3).

    Biological changes associated with aging at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and individual level. Lecture.Also listed as BIO 475 .
  
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    AMC 499 - Selected Topics.


    Upper division undergraduate standing, consent of instructor.(1-3).

    Different topics each semester, to be announced in advance of registration.May be taken more than once, but not so as to repeat a topic.
  
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    AMC 500 - Research Foundations.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Instruction in research methods and sources in American culture. Introduction to key reference works, literature reviews, print and digital primary and secondary sources; journal literature, protocols and ethics in use of human subjects. Guest speakers from various disciplines share research expertise.
  
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    AMC 501 - The Mind of America.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Examination through literature, philosophy, and the arts, of several topics which, taken together, provide an overview of America’s intellectual life as a response to, and comprehension of, the American experience.
  
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    AMC 502 - American Institutions.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Examination of the major social institutions in American society, their development, change, and future.
  
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    AMC 503 - The American Character.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Examination of the question, “Is there an American character?” Analyzes the changing definitions of the American character in the context of the major structural principles around which American society is organized.
  
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    AMC 504 - The United States in Comparative Perspective.


    Graduate standing.(3).

    Encompasses two general approaches: comparison with other societies to achieve an understanding of American culture and the examination of the image of America in the eyes of the world.
 

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