Dec 01, 2022  
2022-2023 Catalog 
  
2022-2023 Catalog

General Education Program


General Education requirements apply to all students pursuing first bachelor’s degrees at the University of Michigan-Flint.  Most courses in the General Education program are meant to be taken early in a student’s career.  General Education courses are open to all students. Students should elect courses in consultation with their advisors to assure progress toward degree requirements and aligment with their academic goals.

The General Education courses delineated in the catalog are accepted at all schools and colleges at UM-Flint.   There are, however, additional general education classes available to students at each of the respective units.  Please check with your school or college to determine what those options might be.  The majority of general education requirements (below) apply institution-wide.  However, students should also consult their unit’s section of the Catalog for possible modifications.

Program Mission

The General Education Program at the University of Michigan-Flint fulfills an important academic role in the student’s total educational experience.  The Program is designed to provide training in reasoning and critical thinking, and to introduce the fundamental disciplines through which people seek to understand themselves, their surroundings, and cultures different from their own.  In accordance with the University’s mission, the General Education Program aims to educate all students in an environment that emphasizes literacy, critical thinking, and humanistic and scientific inquiry.

General Education Goals and Assessment

The General Education Program is designed to provide a broad base for learning both at the University of Michigan-Flint and after graduation. While General Education offers students considerable flexibility in selecting courses, the program has a set of common educational objectives for all students. Our General Education Learning Outcomes highlight qualities that prepare a liberally educated person for a successful and satisfying life. Learning outcomes focus on four areas as outlined below: Integration into the Learning Community of the University of Michigan-Flint; Enhanced Communication Skills (written, verbal and non-verbal); Enhanced Breadth and Interconnectedness of Knowledge; and Engaged Citizenship (local to global). Outcomes are informed by employer priorities confirmed in research of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and career readiness competencies outlined by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), as well as the expertise and experience of our faculty leadership in supporting the success of graduates. Students can expect any course at the 100-400 level carrying General Education credit to include at least three General Education Learning Outcomes among other content and discipline-based goals of the course.  

Integration into the Learning Community of the University of Michigan-Flint

  1. Reflect on one’s own learning processes
  2. Demonstrate facility with research methods 
  3. Demonstrate the ability to think critically
  4. Demonstrate the ability to think creatively

Enhanced Communication Skills:  Written, Verbal and Non-Verbal

  1. Produce competent written work
  2. Participate in dialogue that involves respectful and careful listening
  3. Use visual or non-verbal tools to enhance and decode messages

Enhanced Breadth and Interconnectedness of Knowledge

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of culture and the arts, social structure and process, and the physical and natural world 
  2. Demonstrate quantitative literacy and knowledge of economics, finance, health and well-being, and science and technology 
  3. Use multiple perspectives and methodologies to analyze real or hypothetical problems 

Engaged Citizenship:  Local to Global

  1. Investigate the nature of citizenship 
  2. Apply knowledge to complex issues such as social justice, globalization, economic growth and distribution, environmental sustainability, public health, etc., in increasingly broad spheres of influence 

The General Education Program participates in the University-wide effort to assess its academic programs.  Information on assessment is available at www.umflint.edu/assessment.

Program Requirements

The General Education Program consists of requirements in four components: First Year Experience, English Composition, eight General Education Designations, and a Capstone Experience. A worksheet is provided at the end of this Catalog section.

  1. UNV 100:  First Year Experience (FYE).
    Three credits in courses designated applicable to the First Year Experience requirement.  The letters FYE immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to the First Year Experience General Education requirement.  This course is multidisciplinary in approach and exposes students to multiple perspectives of a particular theme. Topics can vary broadly across sections, but all UNV 100s make connections between local, national and global issues.  In addition to studying the course content of the section, students are introduced to the intellectual work of the university, including information literacy and writing skills, as well as university support resources that will benefit them throughout their academic careers.  Students entering the university with fewer than 25 transfer credit hours must fulfill the FYE requirement within their first academic year. Please refer to the schedule of classes for specific sections and topics.
  2. English Composition.
    Completion of ENG 112 and its writing and reading prerequisites, or the equivalent. This requirement is most typically satisfied by completing ENG 111 (the writing prerequisite of ENG 112) and ENG 112 or equivalent, but, for students who do not transfer in ENG 112, the full sequence of courses required to complete the English Composition requirement is determined by writing and reading placements. Based on writing placement, some students will need credits of ENG 109 before taking ENG 111 (the writing prerequisite of ENG 112). Based on reading placement, some students will need ENG 100 (the reading prerequisite of ENG 112). Students who do not transfer in equivalent English Composition credits will ordinarily take two to four courses to complete this requirement (two courses based on successful writing and reading placements: ENG 111 and ENG 112; three courses based on writing placement signalling the need for additional writing instruction: ENG 109, ENG 111, and ENG 112; three courses based on reading placement signalling the need for reading support: ENG 100, ENG 111, and ENG 112; or four courses based on reading and writing placements signalling needs for additional support in both reading and writing: ENG 100, ENG 109, ENG 111, and ENG 112). Information on placement is available at https://www.umflint.edu/studentsuccess/placement-exams/.  Students selected for the Honors Program ordinarily satisfy this requirement by completing HON 155 and HON 156.  The University strongly recommends that students begin their required English Composition sequence in the first semester and follow-through with completing their sequence as early as possible in their coursework.
  3. General Education Designations.
    Credits across the General Education designations foster breadth of knowledge and encourage critical thinking about the interconnectedness of knowledge. Courses across the General Education Designations help students to gain an understanding of the world around them, to make informed decisions and engage in informed actions, to effectively communicate reasoning to a wide audience, and to practice skills and dispositions of flexible and meaningful life-long learning that make one a valuable contributor on the job and in our local and global communities.
    Students will select courses that fulfill requirements of the following eight designations:
    Humanities (H)      
    Humanities courses explore multiple understandings of the human condition. These courses use ideas, stories, and words to help us make sense of our lives by addressing dilemmas and acknowledging ambiguity and paradox.  Six credits in courses designated as applicable to the Humanities requirement.  The letter H immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Social Science (S)    
    Social science courses focus on people and the institutions within which they interact as individuals, and in groups, societies, nations, and states. These courses analyze social structures and processes or cultural meanings associated with collective human interactions.  Six credits in courses designated as applicable to the Social Science requirement.  The letter S immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Global Studies (GS)      
    Courses in Global Studies develop awareness of global issues, and the diversity of cultures and languages, perspectives, histories, lived experiences, and values. These courses help students understand diverse political and societal realities by addressing social, cultural, political, economic, or historical factors.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Global Studies requirement.  The letters GS immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Fine Arts (F)     
    Courses whose primary focus is the creation, re-creation, and study of creative processes in the visual and performing arts that reflect cultural development and growth, as well as the current and historical trends of global cultures through aesthetic concepts.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Fine Arts requirement.  The letter F immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Health and Well-Being (HW)        
    Courses in health and well-being develop an awareness of health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. These courses focus on exploring multiple dimensions and multiple social determinants of health including diverse domestic and global health practices, issues and policies.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Health and Well-Being requirement.  The letters HW immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Finance and Quantitative Literacy (FQ)       
    Finance and Quantitative Literacy courses develop quantitative reasoning skills that can be applied effectively in life and work across multiple domains.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Finance and Quantitative Literacy requirement.  The letters FQ immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.
    Natural Sciences (N/NL)    
    Natural Science courses focus on the scientific method(s), principles, concepts, models and experimentation, as well as the limitations of such endeavors, to explore natural phenomena to advance a better understanding of the natural world. These courses include laboratory experiences to further develop a student’s understanding of the scientific method, observation skills, and experimental methods and techniques.  Four credits in laboratory science courses designated as applicable to the Natural Sciences requirement.  The letters N and/or NL immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to this requirement.  Note: Applicable credits must include at least one credit with N/NL designation, indicating laboratory experience.
    Technology (T)    
    Technology courses develop knowledge and understanding of technological processes and systems, and their interrelationship with life, society, or environment. Courses will focus explicitly on technology or the use of technology to solve complex problems.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Technology requirement.  The letter T immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement. 

  4. Capstone Experience (CAP)     
    Capstone courses foster application and synthesis of knowledge gained through general education and in the major. The Capstone is typically taken in the senior year. Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Capstone requirement.  The letters CAP immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.  

General Education Requirements Worksheet

The General Education Worksheet can be found here .

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